Is it time to stop skimming over full-fat dairy?

Americans consume about 150 pounds of milk and eat nearly 40 pounds of cheese and 20 pounds of ice cream per person per year, according to data from the Department of Agriculture. Yogurt and butter intakes are lower, but growing. But should the dairy we’re consuming be low-fat or full-fat? That debate has become increasingly divisive, and for good reason: not all dairy is created equal. Dairy fat and cardiovascular disease Some of the most substantial dairy research has been done in the context of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which has been shown, among other benefits, to reduce blood pressure and lower cholesterol, both risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Along with promoting heart-healthy fats and fiber-rich foods, the DASH dietary plan recommends two to three servings per day of low-fat or fat-free dairy, primarily from milk, yogurt, and cheese. The vitamin and mineral content in these items, plus protein compounds called peptides, are believed to play a role in protecting the heart. Probiotics in fermented dairy products, like yogurt, have also been shown to improve blood pressure, and have been associated with decreasing CVD risk. More recently, however, research has suggested that dairy need not be stripped of its fat. Some studies have indicated full-fat sources may not play a role in CVD-related deaths, and might even be protective in some cases. This is not a call to arms for butter. Though recent data did not show an asso...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

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Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionAccording to the results, whey supplementation significantly reduced the SBP, DBP, HDL, waist circumference, TG and FBS in intervention groups in comparing to control groups.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 November 2019Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): Mariceli Comellas, Yamile Marrero, Florence George, Lisa MatthewsAbstractAimTo assess the age and its association with glycemic control (GC) among adults with type 2-diabetes in the United States.Materials and MaterialsData were collected from the National Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2013 -2014 (n=697), cross-sectional national survey adults with Type2 diabetes. Characteristics included retinopathy diagnosis, blood pressure, albumin-creatinine ratio, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), BMI, ch...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 14 November 2019Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): Seema Gulati, Anoop Misra
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionHigh prevalences of underweight and overweight/obesity were identified in ASEAN countries and several correlates were identified which can help to tailor interventions.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN (CNN) — If you’re a fan of the Mediterranean diet, get ready to do a victory dance. For the first time, the Mediterranean diet has won the gold as 2019’s best overall diet in rankings announced Wednesday by US News and World Report. The analysis of 41 eating plans also gave the Mediterranean diet the top spot in several subcategories: best diet for healthy eating, best plant-based diet, best diet for diabetes and easiest diet to follow. The high accolades are not surprising, as numerous studies found the diet can reduce the risk for diabetes, high cholesterol, de...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News best diets CNN Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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