What can Google Trends and Wikipedia-Pageview analysis tell us about the landscape of epilepsy surgery over time?

ConclusionThis study suggests a lower search interest over time in epilepsy surgery, and various associated terms, with increased interest in vagus nerve stimulation and laser ablation procedures over time. There is no clear indication from these data regarding the apparent shift from mesial temporal cases to an increase in extratemporal case workload.
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Summary: Invasive vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approved treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Besides recognized clinical efficacy in about 60% of patients, there are major drawbacks such as invasiveness and common side effects including hoarseness, sore throat, shortness of breath, and coughing. Invasive VNS applies electrical stimulation to the left cervical branch of the vagus nerve and excites thick-myelinated afferent nerve fibers. Peripheral vagus nerve afferent volley initiates brainstem activity in the nucleus of the solitary tract and provokes typical brainstem and cerebral activation patterns that media...
Source: Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology - Category: Neurology Tags: Invited Review Source Type: research
Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy is a surgical treatment that involves the implantation of a device to electrically stimulate the vagus nerve. It is indicated as an adjunctive treatment of epilepsy that is refractory to antiepileptic medications and for treatment-resistant depression. The exact mechanism by which VNS achieves its effects is not known, but various mechanisms have been proposed, including afferent vagal projections to seizure-generating regions of the brain and desynchronization of hypersynchronized cortical activity. The most common complications of VNS therapy include hoarseness, throat pain/dysphagia...
Source: Otolaryngologic clinics of North America - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
The current literature on peripheral cranial nerve stimulation for the purpose of achieving therapeutic effects via altering brain activity is reviewed. Vagus nerve stimulation, which is approved for use in refractory epilepsy, is the most extensively studied cranial nerve stimulator that has direct impact on the central nervous system. Despite the recognized central effects of peripheral cranial nerve stimulation, the mechanism of action for all indications remains incompletely understood. Further research on both mechanisms and indications of central effects of cranial nerve stimulation has the potential to alleviate bur...
Source: Otolaryngologic clinics of North America - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study suggests a lower search interest over time in epilepsy surgery, and various associated terms, with increased interest in vagus nerve stimulation and laser ablation procedures over time. There is no clear indication from these data regarding the apparent shift from mesial temporal cases to an increase in extratemporal case workload. PMID: 31645311 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
ConclusionOur results suggest that pulsed FUS exposure effectively suppresses epileptic spikes in an acute epilepsy animal model, and finds that ultrasound pulsation interferes with neuronal activity and affects the PTZ-induced PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which might help explain the mechanism underlying ultrasound-related epileptic spike control.
Source: Brain Stimulation - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionOur results suggest that pulsed FUS exposure effectively suppresses epileptic spikes in an acute epilepsy animal model, and finds that ultrasound pulsation interferes with neuronal activity and affects the PTZ-induced PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, which might help explain the mechanism underlying ultrasound-related epileptic spike control.
Source: Brain Stimulation - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal neuron discharge, and one-third of epilepsy patients suffer from drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). The current management for DRE includes epileptogenic lesion resection, disconnection, and neuromodulation. Neuromodulation is achieved through invasive electrical stimulus including deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation (RNS). As an alternative therapy, transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) can transcranially and non-invasively modulate neuron activity.
Source: BRAIN STIMULATION: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionHalf of the patients had not perceived clear benefit from VNS, and all but one terminated VNS without worsening of seizures within one year. The true outcome of long-term VNS is difficult to assess in real-world practice. The effect may be overestimated due to confounding factors, particularly the common introduction of novel AEDs and the natural course of the disorder. Patients without perceived benefit from long-term VNS should not routinely remain on treatment and be subject to undue generator re-implantations.
Source: Seizure - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 September 2019Source: Trends in Pharmacological SciencesAuthor(s): Omid Kavehei, Tara Julia Hamilton, Nhan Duy Truong, Armin NikpourEpilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects ~1% of the world population. Nearly 30% of epilepsy patients suffer from pharmacoresistant epilepsy that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs. Depending on seizure type, a diverse range of therapies are available, including surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. We review the sensing and stimulation technologies most used in neurological disorders, and provide a vision of minimall...
Source: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 August 2019Source: Neurochemistry InternationalAuthor(s): Jingxi Ma, Peifeng Qiao, Qin Li, Yangyang Wang, Lan Zhang, Liang-Jun Yan, Zhiyou CaiAbstractThe Food and Drug Administration has approved vagus-nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of patients with epilepsy, depression, and headache. By targeting diverse neuroprotective and neuroplasticity pathways, VNS has the potential to be expanded as a treatment for ischemic stroke. VNS has been found to attenuate infarct volume, reduce neurological deficits, and improve memory and cognition in rats with stroke injuries. Some pilot stu...
Source: Neurochemistry International - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
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