Recent Emergence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Ontario, Canada: Early Serological and Entomological Indicators.

Recent Emergence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Ontario, Canada: Early Serological and Entomological Indicators. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2019 Oct 14;: Authors: Nelder MP, Russell CB, Lindsay LR, Dibernardo A, Brandon NC, Pritchard J, Johnson S, Cronin K, Patel SN Abstract Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), caused by the bacteria Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in eastern North America. To assess the emergence of A. phagocytophilum in Ontario, we analyzed patient serological and clinical data in combination with pathogen detection in blacklegged ticks from 2011 to 2017. Our sample population included all patients who had Anaplasma serological testing ordered by their physicians (n = 851). Eighty-three patients (10.8%) were A. phagocytophilum seropositive (IgG titers ≥ 1:64) and 686 (89.2%) were seronegative (IgG titers
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research

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Human granulocytic anaplasmosis or anaplasmosis is a zoonotic disease that is endemic to certain geographic areas of the United States. Anaplasmosis is caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an intracellular bacterium that is transmitted to humans by deer ticks. The clinical presentation can vary from a subclinical infection to fulminant disease resulting in multiorgan failure and death. Patients commonly present with fever, malaise, myalgia, headache, nausea, vomiting, arthralgia, and cough. Central nervous system involvement has also been reported. Here, we present 2 cases that presented with significant diagnostic challen...
Source: Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur findings indicated thatA.phagocytophilum infection was prevalent but unrecognized in Taiwan.
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Larissa A. Martins1, Camila D. Malossi1†, Maria F. B. de M. Galletti1†, José M. Ribeiro2, André Fujita3, Eliane Esteves4, Francisco B. Costa5, Marcelo B. Labruna5, Sirlei Daffre1 and Andréa C. Fogaça1* 1Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 2Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD, United States 3Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Instituto de Matemática e Estatística,...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
AbstractHuman granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) is a tickborne rickettsial disease caused by the bacteriumAnaplasma phagocytophilum. Reported cases have increased with the highest incidence in the Northeast. To our knowledge, this is the first report of anaplasmosis associated with an inflammatory arthritis. A 64-year-old man, with a history of Crohn ’s disease controlled on budesonide, presented to the emergency room in August 2017 with a week history of headache, sore throat, fever, myalgias, rash, and joint pain. There was no clinical evidence of active Crohn’s disease. He lives in Nassau County and participat...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
Ticks and the diseases they carry have long been recognized as health concerns, especially in the warmer months when ticks (and humans) are more active. Ticks wait on grass tips or shrubs to latch onto new hosts when they brush by. Most of the hosts are animals, but a few tick species do bite and feed on humans. While doing so, they can transmit bacteria and viruses through their saliva. But here’s what’s changing: Tick species are being found in a wider geographic range. The number of case reports of tick-borne illnesses is increasing. Scientists continue to identify new pathogens (bacteria and viruses that c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Travel health Source Type: blogs
Ticks and the diseases they carry have long been recognized as health concerns, especially in the warmer months when ticks (and humans) are more active. Ticks wait on grass tips or shrubs to latch onto new hosts when they brush by. Most of the hosts are animals, but a few tick species do bite and feed on humans. While doing so, they can transmit bacteria and viruses through their saliva. But here’s what’s changing: Tick species are being found in a wider geographic range. The number of case reports of tick-borne illnesses is increasing. Scientists continue to identify new pathogens (bacteria and viruses that c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Safety Travel health Source Type: blogs
“Doesn’t it typically happen during the summer?” asked a worried lady that had walked into my clinic in November with a growing circular rash on her wrist. She was referring, of course, to Lyme disease, that scourge of outdoor enthusiasts. While the peak season for Lyme disease is indeed summer, the ticks that transmit it are active March through December. And, while this may be off-season for the ticks, it is a good time to catch up on how to stay safe in the not-so-distant spring. What is Lyme disease, and how do you treat it? Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi which is sp...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Source Type: blogs
To the Editor Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), caused by the rickettsia Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is vectored by the same Ixodes spp ticks that transmit Lyme disease. HGA is associated with fever, headache, cytopenia, and rarely mortality (if the infection occurs in elderly or immunocompromised hosts). HGA is not spread person-to-person by mucocutaneous exposure to the blood of infected patients; does not typically, or perhaps ever, cause bleeding from multiple body sites; is not usually associated with diarrhea; and has never been associated with relative bradycardia. Convalescent phase antibody titers to the etiol...
Source: JAMA - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: research
Early this summer, I spent several days in a hospital bed, tethered to an IV, with what proved in retrospect to be anaplasmosis (a nasty bit of tick-borne business), complicated by viral meningitis. The latter was likely due to the immunosuppression of the primary infection. It was all rather unpleasant. Among other things, I had a constant, moderate headache punctuated by crushing head pain- easily, the worst headaches I've ever experienced. I was given narcotics when the pain was at its worst, and they didn't do much for me, despite their two distinct advantages. The first is that these drugs are genuinely effective at t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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