Association of obesity with cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Insights from TECOS

Publication date: Available online 20 October 2019Source: American Heart JournalAuthor(s): Neha J. Pagidipati, Yinggan Zheng, Jennifer B. Green, Darren K. McGuire, Robert J. Mentz, Svati Shah, Pablo Aschner, Tuncay Delibasi, Helena W. Rodbard, Cynthia M. Westerhout, Rury R. Holman, Eric D. Peterson, on behalf of the TECOS Study GroupAbstractBackgroundObesity is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Whether obesity affects outcomes among those with T2D and atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD) remains uncertain. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and ASCVD outcomes among TECOS participants with T2D and ASCVD.MethodsBMI categories were defined as underweight/normal weight (BMI
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

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Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
For decades, doctors have known that losing weight can significantly lower risk of heart disease and by extension, reduce the risk of dying from heart-related events such as stroke and heart attack. Studies have shown that both lifestyle changes including diet and exercise as well as medications and weight-loss surgery can improve heart disease risk factors such as obesity and diabetes, for example, but data supporting the benefits of any of these approaches in actually lowering rates of heart events such as heart attack and atrial fibrillation, or in reducing early deaths from heart disease, have been less robust. The dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diabetes Heart Disease Source Type: news
Reducing the risk of macrovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, is a major goal when treating diabetes. Despite this focus, of the major randomized trials used to support current diabetes guidelines (ACCORD, ADVANCE, UKPDS 33, UKPDS 34, VADT), none showed reductions in macrovascular events when the trial results were first reported. For example, UKPDS is still frequently cited in support of aggressive glucose lowering, yet when the primary outcome data were presented in 1998, the results showed no difference between groups in terms of reducing the risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 0.94...
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Authors: Abdaly MS, Azizi MS, Wijaya IP, Nugroho P, Purnamasari D Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remain a leading cause of death globally. The concept of acute myocardial infarction in young adults was uncommon. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of CVD, including myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure and peripheral artery disease. This condition is initiated early in childhood and progressive in nature. CVD risk factors includes hypertension, dyslipidemia and obesity play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and  components in insulin resistance syndrome.One of many risk factors for in...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
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Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionHigh blood pressure is a public health problem most often associated with other cardiovascular risk factors. An evaluation of cardiovascular risk is necessary in postmenopausal hypertensive diabetic women and effective management of risk factors is recommended.
Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
ConclusionOrthostatic Hypotension is relatively rare in our patients with type 2 diabetes and was significantly associated with nephropathy and neuropathy.
Source: Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases Supplements - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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