Who will care for the caregiver? Distress and depression among spousal caregivers of older patients undergoing treatment for cancer

ConclusionIncreasing patient age and caregiver ’s perceived spousal support may both have a positive effect on caregivers’ levels of depression. This can be utilized by clinicians in the process of empowering older patients and their spousal caregivers to confront the challenges of cancer treatment into advanced old age.
Source: Supportive Care in Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: Telemedicine could be a useful tool to enhance the general well-being of palliative oncology patients. Now that the feasibility of this approach has been confirmed, larger studies are needed to verify its positive impact on the QoL. PMID: 31667588 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Wien Klin Wochenschr Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to verify whether levels of perceived social support are associated with psychosocial functioning in women who have had a mastectomy and whether specific types of social support are linked to specific indices of functioning. METHOD: Seventy women with a history of mastectomy completed questionnaires measuring their psychosocial functioning as related to their health status: Disease-Related Appraisal Scale, Acceptance of Life with the Disease Scale and Beck Depression Inventory. All participants also completed a measure of perceived social support (Disease-Related Social Support Scale). ...
Source: Palliative and Supportive Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Palliat Support Care Source Type: research
Over the past two decades, several trials addressed the impact of the early integration of palliative care on the clinical outcomes of advanced cancer patients. The first pivotal results from a randomized clinical trial on patients with newly diagnosed stage III and IV non small-cell-lung cancer, demonstrated that patients who received concurrent palliative care with standard cancer care, had better quality of life, less depressive symptoms, also longer median survival, and less aggressive treatment at the end of life, compared to patients receiving standard oncology care alone [1].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: There is strong association between the presence and severity of pain and distress symptoms such as anxiety and depression in admitted cancer patients.
Source: Indian Journal of Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVES: Psychosocial interventions that mitigate psychosocial distress in cancer patients are important. The primary aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and acceptability of an adaptation of the Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) program among adult cancer patients. A secondary aim was to examine pre-post-program changes in psychosocial wellbeing. METHOD: The research design was a feasibility and acceptability study, with an examination of pre- to post-intervention changes in psychosocial measures. A study information pack was posted to 173 adult cancer patients 6 months-5 years post-diag...
Source: Palliative and Supportive Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Palliat Support Care Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Preloss mental burden showed to be a consistent predictor for postloss burden and should be addressed during palliative care. Future research should examine specific caregiver-directed interventions during specialist palliative care. PMID: 31596115 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care - Category: Palliative Care Authors: Tags: Am J Hosp Palliat Care Source Type: research
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: cancer opioids pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)A Series of Observations on Opioids By a Palliative Doc Who Prescribes A Lot of Opioids But Also Has Questions.This is the 5th post in a series about opioids, with a focus on how my thinking about opioids has changed over the years. See also:Part 1 – Introduction, General Disclaimers, Hand-Wringing, and a Hand-Crafted Graph.Part 2 – We Were Wrong 20 years Ago, Our Current Response to the Opioid Crisis is Wrong, But We Should Still Be Helping Most of our Long-Term Patients Reduce Their Opioid DosesPart 3 – Opioids Have Ceiling Effects, High-Doses are Rarely Therapeutic, and Ano...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioid pain rosielle The profession Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsThis study supports previous findings that higher performance status, cancer diagnosis and higher baseline pain intensity predict analgesic RT response. The study presents new data showing that presence of soft tissue expansion predicts RT response and that CRP is not significantly associated with analgesic RT response.Clinical trial identificationNCT02107664 (Date of registration April 8, 2014).Legal entity responsible for the studyP ål Klepstad.FundingThe European Palliative Care Research Centre (PRC).DisclosureAll authors have declared no conflicts of interest.
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and fibrosing lung disease with a poor prognosis. Between 60% and 70% of IPF patients die of IPF; the remaining causes of death may be due to comorbidities occurring in this ageing population. Interest in the role played by comorbidities in IPF has increased in the past few years. The optimal clinical management of IPF is multifaceted and not only involves antifibrotic treatment, but also vaccinations, oxygen supplementation, evaluation of nutritional status as well as psychological support and patient education. Symptom management, pulmonary rehabilitation, palliative c...
Source: European Respiratory Review - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Pulmonary vascular disease Review Source Type: research
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