New role for crinamine as a potent, safe and selective inhibitor of human monoamine oxidase B: In vitro and in silico pharmacology and modeling

Discussion and conclusionCrinamine and epibuphanisine exhibited potent and selective inhibitory activity towards MAO-B. After comprehensive in silico investigations encompassing robust molecular docking analysis, the drug-like attributes and safety of the alkaloids suggest the crinamine is a potentially safe drug for human application.Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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A behavioral brain fad called “dopamine fasting” (#dopaminefasting) has been floating around the internet for the past year. The idea is that by restricting most of your pleasurable daily activities — from social media, to watching videos, gaming, talking, or even eating — you can “reset” your brain. The idea also plays into people’s simplistic beliefs about how the brain works. Can you have conscious control over discrete dopamine levels in your brain? Let’s delve into the science behind one of your brain’s most important neurotransmitters, dopamine. During a “d...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior General Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Research dopamine fasting Neuroscience Neurotransmitter social media Technology unplug Source Type: blogs
In this study, it was found that acetaldehyde treatment induced excessive mitochondrial fragmentation, impaired mitochondrial function and caused cytotoxicity in cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. Further analyses showed that acetaldehyde induced the phosphorylation of mitochondrial fission related protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) at Ser616 and promoted its translocation to mitochondria. The elevation of Drp1 phosphorylation was partly dependent on the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) pre...
Source: Redox Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
This study aimed to assess demographics and clinical characteristics of patients who had recurrent falls attending the medicine for the older person (MFTOP) outpatient department at a tertiary centre.MethodsRetrospective analysis of patients seen at MFTOP OPD between January 2018 and December 2018. Data were obtained from clinical notes. Age, gender, blood pressure, cognitive tests, blood tests, diagnoses and medications that could contribute to falls were recorded.Results100 patients were reviewed. 60% were female (60). Mean and median ages were 83. Causes of falls included; gait/balance disorders or weakness 36.0%, envir...
Source: Age and Ageing - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
BY ​MICHELE STYBEL; LAURIE-ANN ANTOINE; JENNIFER TUONG; AHMED RAZIUDDIN, MDA 54-year-old man with a past medical history of COPD presented to the ED with shortness of breath that had started an hour earlier. He was alert and oriented, but also agitated, combative, and unable to provide an adequate history.He said he was a heavy smoker and drinker and that he had been smoking and consuming alcohol when the symptoms started. He also reported past Cannabis use.He was in acute respiratory distress with BiPAP in place, restless, and diaphoretic. Respiration was labored with bilateral expiratory wheezing but no signi...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet and sugary beverages and health risks, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage, obesity or another hidden health issue. “The cause behind these associations isn’t clear,” said Bergquist. “Other potential biological causes could be attributed to experimental evidence linking consumption of artificial sweeteners to sugar cravings, appetite stimulation ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Soda Source Type: news
Zhou Retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), mainly secreted by the liver and adipocytes, is a transporter of vitamin A. RBP4 has been shown to be involved in several pathophysiological processes, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk. Reports have indicated the high expression levels of RBP4 in cystic follicles. However, the role of RBP4 in mammalian follicular granulosa cells (GCs) remains largely unknown. To illustrate the molecular pathways associated with the effects of RBP4 on GCs, we used high-throughput sequencing to detect differential gene expression in GCs overexpressing RBP4. A total of 1...
Source: Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Homocysteine (Hcy); a sulfur-containing non-proteinogenic amino acid is generated as a metabolic intermediate. Hcy constitutes an important part of the "1-carbon metabolism" during methionine turnover. Elevated levels of Hcy known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) results from vitamin B deficiency, lack of exercise, smoking, excessive alcohol intake, high fat and methionine rich diet, and the underlying genetic defects. These factors directly affect the "1-carbon metabolism (methionine-Hcy-folate)" of a given cell. In fact, the Hcy levels are determined primarily by dietary intake, vitami...
Source: Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Can J Physiol Pharmacol Source Type: research
I read the AFPI position paper on road safety and public health with interest.[1] The authors mentioned the use of alcohol, co-morbid medical conditions (diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy), and adverse drug reactions ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news
Abstract The uniquely human α7-nAChR gene (CHRFAM7A) is evolved from the fusion of two partially duplicated genes, FAM7 and α7-nAChR gene (CHRNA7), and is inserted on same chromosome 15, 5' end of the CHRNA7 gene. Transcription of CHRFAM7A gene produces a 1256-bp open reading frame encoding dup-α7-nAChR, where a 27-aminoacid residues from FAM7 replaced the 146-aminoacid residues of the N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain of α7-nAChR. In vitro, dup-α7-nAChR has been shown to form hetero-pentamer with α7-nAChR and dominant-negatively regulates the channel functions of &...
Source: Gene - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Gene Source Type: research
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