Maternal microbiome and the hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, preeclampsia.

Maternal microbiome and the hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, preeclampsia. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol. 2019 Oct 18;: Authors: Beckers KF, Sones JL Abstract Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy specific disorder that can be life threatening for both mother and baby. It is characterized by new onset hypertension during the second half of pregnancy and affects approximately 300,000 women in the United States every year. There is no cure for PE and the only effective treatment is delivery of the placenta and the fetus, which is often preterm. PE is believed to be a severe manifestation of placental dysfunction due to early angiogenic imbalances and inflammatory disturbances; however, the cause of this is unknown. The once thought "sterile" placenta now has been proposed to have a unique microbiome of its own. Under ideal conditions, the microbiome represents a balanced bacterial community that is important to the maintenance of a healthy environment. Dysbiosis of these communities may lead to inflammation that potentially contributes to adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as preterm birth and PE. Thus far, the female reproductive tract microbiome has been found to be influenced by periodontal disease, cardiometabolic complications, and maternal obesity, all of which have been identified as contributors to PE. This review will look at the maternal reproductive tract microbiome, evidence for and against its role in pregnancy and PE-related events as...
Source: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol Source Type: research

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This study demonstrated that the incidence of ischemic heart disease and death were three times higher among men with low birth weight compared to men with high birth weight (5). Epidemiological investigations of adults born at the time of the Dutch famine between 1944 and 1945 revealed an association between maternal starvation and a low infant birth weight with a high incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease in these adults (23). Furthermore, Painter et al. reported the incidence of early onset coronary heart disease among persons conceived during the Dutch famine (24). In that regard, Barker's findin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Discussion Infant size at birth is determined mainly by genetics, but also pregnancy and environmental factors. Large for gestational age (LGA) is defined as a mean weight> 2 standard deviations above the weight for gestational age or above the 90th percentile on growth charts (or ~4000 g on WHO growth charts). Macrosomia is a term used for a term infant who is> 4000g. Risk factors for LGA infants includes: Male infant Maternal Genetic disposition Hispanic ethnicity Diabetic Multiparity or grand parity Obesity History of previous LGA infant Prenatal ultrasound is very helpful for antenatal management. First tri...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Conclusions: Findings from our experimental model suggest that the offspring of dams exposed to ozone during implantation had reduced growth compared with controls, possibly as a consequence of ozone-induced vascular dysfunction. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP2019 Received: 10 April 2017 Revised: 7 November 2017 Accepted: 13 November 2017 Published: 21 December 2017 Address correspondence to C.N. Miller, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL/EPHD/CIB, 109 T.W. Alexander Dr., Mail Code: B105-02, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711. Telephone: 919-541-3469. Email: miller.colette@epa.gov Supplemental Material is availab...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The foods we eat play a central role in our health. The epidemics of our time—obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes—are intimately tied to unhealthy patterns of eating. But eating healthy is also expensive, making it particularly challenging for the 12% of US households who have to worry whether they can afford enough food each month. For the 41 million Americans living in these households, a common coping strategy is to purchase cheaper, less healthy foods in an effort to make their food budgets last longer. Over time, however, these unhealthy dietary patterns can have a significant impact on a person’...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diet Diet/Nutrition food insecurity Food stamps Health Care health care costs Healthy Eating SNAP Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Source Type: news
Opinion statementAll providers who care for reproductive-aged women with cardiac disease should assess these patients ’ desires and plans for pregnancy at every encounter. For those considering pregnancy, preconception counseling, often performed by a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, can help patients understand the potential implications of pregnancy on their health and estimate the risks of an adverse cardia c event prior to conceiving. There are cardiac conditions, such as pulmonary hypertension and aortic stenosis, in which pregnancy may be contraindicated given the high morbidity and mortality; there are tool...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
This study shows that lifespan-extending conditions can slow molecular changes associated with an epigenetic clock in mice livers. Diverse interventions that extend mouse lifespan suppress shared age-associated epigenetic changes at critical gene regulatory regions Age-associated epigenetic changes are implicated in aging. Notably, age-associated DNA methylation changes comprise a so-called aging "clock", a robust biomarker of aging. However, while genetic, dietary and drug interventions can extend lifespan, their impact on the epigenome is uncharacterised. To fill this knowledge gap, we defined...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Concerns about the world’s most widely used herbicide are taking a new twist as researchers unveil data that indicates pervasive use of Monsanto Co.’s weed killer could be linked to pregnancy problems. Researchers looking at exposure to the herbicide known as glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup-branded herbicides, said they tested and tracked 69 expectant mothers and found that the presence of glyphosate levels in their bodily fluids correlated with unfavorable birth outcomes. The research is still in preliminary stages and the sample size is small, but the team is scheduled to present th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The Northeast ― especially Massachusetts ― is the healthiest place in the country for women and children to live, according to the “America’s Health Rankings” report published this month by United Health Foundation. The report compared all 50 states based on 60 health measures in four categories: health behavior of residents, policy, socio-structural factors and health care. The researchers looked specifically at women’s health. They analyzed factors including the rate of sexually transmitted diseases, obesity and smoking (the behavioral component); the number of publicly-funded women’s he...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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