Complementemia in pregnancies with antiphospholipid syndrome.

Complementemia in pregnancies with antiphospholipid syndrome. Lupus. 2019 Oct 17;:961203319882507 Authors: Tabacco S, Giannini A, Garufi C, Botta A, Salvi S, Del Sordo G, Benedetti Panici P, Lanzone A, De Carolis S Abstract Prognosis of pregnancies in women with antiphospholipid syndrome has dramatically improved over the past two decades using conventional treatment with low molecular weight heparin and low-dose aspirin. However, despite this regimen, 10-15% of antiphospholipid syndrome patients experience pregnancy losses. Several studies have been performed in order to identify risk factors predictive of complications. Thrombosis has been generally accepted as the key pathogenetic mechanism underlying pregnancy morbidity. However, the thrombogenic state alone is not able to explain all the different mechanisms leading to pregnancy failure. In fact, emerging evidence shows that complement pathway could play an important role in mediating clinical events in antiphospholipid syndrome. However, the exact mechanism through which complement mediates antiphospholipid syndrome complications remains unknown. Low complement levels (C3 and C4) are associated with poor pregnancy outcome in women with antiphospholipid syndrome in different studies. Hypocomplementemia could be indicated as an early predictor of adverse pregnancy outcome, available at the beginning of pregnancy for starting, if necessary, additional treatment to conventional therapy. However, future...
Source: Lupus - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Lupus Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Lisa R. SammaritanoAbstractAppropriate contraception and preconception counseling are critical for women of reproductive age with systemic autoimmune diseases (AIDs) because clinical diagnosis, rheumatology medications, and disease activity may impact the safety or efficacy of certain contraceptives as well as the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The presence of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies (anticardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein I, and lupus anticoagulant) is the most important de...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Conclusions: 1. Clinical suspicion of APS requires careful diagnostic testing. Because of inadequate diagnostic workup, many patients may not even have an APS, and these patients could be adequately treated with a DOAC. 2. Patients with single or double positive antiphospholipid antibodies but without positive LA may have a comparably low thrombotic risk and may also be treated with a DOAC in venous TE - sufficient evidence for that conclusion is not yet available but is suggested by the results of meta-analyses. 3. Triple positive patients or those with APS who suffered from arterial thromboembolism have a very high ...
Source: VASA. Zeitschrift fur Gefasskrankheiten. Journal for Vascular Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Vasa Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: Best Practice &Research Clinical Obstetrics &GynaecologyAuthor(s): Lisa R. SammaritanoAbstractAppropriate contraception and preconception counseling are critical for women of reproductive age with systemic autoimmune diseases since clinical diagnosis, rheumatology medications, and disease activity may impact the safety or efficacy of certain contraceptives as well as the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin, anti-β2 Glycoprotein I and lupus anticoagulant) is the most important determinant of con...
Source: Best Practice and Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is as an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and/or specific pregnancy-related morbidity associated with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies, namely, lupus anticoagulant and IgG and IgM antibodies to cardiolipin and beta2 glycoprotein I. Optimal antibody detection plays a central role in diagnosis and classification. This review discusses antiphospholipid antibodies helpful for diagnosing APS. It includes the criteria and noncriteria antiphospholipid antibodies, methods for their detection, and challenges for clinical reporting and interpretation. The significance of using spec...
Source: Clinics in Laboratory Medicine - Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: Pregnancy and postpartum were the most common predisposing factors for CVST in our cohort. Although the mortality rate is low, the risk of residual neurological deficit remains high. We recommend a prospective study for better characterization and outcome assessment. PMID: 31555420 [PubMed]
Source: Oman Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Oman Med J Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our data support testing for aCL and aβ2GPI IgM in women suspected of obstetric APS. However, no added value was found for testing IgM in patients suspected of thrombotic APS. Still, IgM aPL might be useful as a second line test to improve thrombotic risk stratification. PMID: 31519058 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Thrombosis and Haemostasis - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: J Thromb Haemost Source Type: research
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The antibodies currently included in the classification criteria include lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) and anti-^2-glycoprotein 1 antibodies (^2GPI). APS can present with a variety of clinical phenotypes, including thrombosis in the veins, arteries and microvasculature and obstetrical complications. Pregnancy complications in obstetric APS (OAPS) include unexplained recurrent early pregnancy loss, fetal death, or premature birth due to severe preeclampsia, eclampsia, intr...
Source: Thrombosis Research - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Thrombophilias are inherited or acquired predispositions to vascular thrombosis and have been associated with thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula. Patients on hemodialysis with recurrent vascular access thrombosis and presence of thrombophilia should be evaluated about the need for anticoagulant therapy with a vitamin K antagonist. PMID: 31419276 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: J Bras Nefrol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 July 2019Source: Seminars in Cancer BiologyAuthor(s): Md. Asiful IslamAbstractAntiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are autoantibodies with laboratory significance in developing thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). High prevalence of aPLs namely - anticardiolipin, anti-β2-glycoprotein I, lupus anticoagulant, antiphosphatidylcholine, antiphosphatidylserine, antiphosphatidylinositol, antiphosphatidylethanolamine and antiprothrombin antibodies have been observed in patients with different types of haematological malignancies and solid tumours. Although ...
Source: Seminars in Cancer Biology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Abstract Antiphospholipid syndrome an autoimmune disease characterized by thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity alongside the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). This review evaluates primary and secondary thromboprophylaxis in patients with aPL and thrombotic events. In primary thromboprophylaxis a risk-stratified approach is needed based on aPL, comorbidity with other autoimmune conditions and cardiovascular vascular risk factors. In primary thromboprophylaxis, the efficacy of low-dose aspirin is debatable and requires better-designed controlled studies. So far warfarin has not been shown to improve v...
Source: Lupus - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Lupus Source Type: research
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