Monosynaptic tracing maps brain-wide afferent oligodendrocyte precursor cell connectivity

Neurons form bona fide synapses with oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), but the circuit context of these neuron to OPC synapses remains incompletely understood. Using monosynaptically-restricted rabies virus tracing of OPC afferents, we identified extensive afferent synaptic inputs to OPCs residing in secondary motor cortex, corpus callosum, and primary somatosensory cortex of adult mice. These inputs primarily arise from functionally-interconnecting cortical areas and thalamic nuclei, illustrating that OPCs have strikingly comprehensive synaptic access to brain-wide projection networks. Quantification of these inputs revealed excitatory and inhibitory components that are consistent in number across brain regions and stable in barrel cortex despite whisker trimming-induced sensory deprivation.
Source: eLife - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Neuroscience Source Type: research

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New research raises hopes of oral vaccine for dogs, the chief source of transmission to humansResearchers have discovered a way to stop rabies from shutting down critical responses in the immune system, a breakthrough that could pave the way for new tools to fight the deadly disease.Rabies kills almost60,000 people each year, mostly affecting poor and rural communities.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Global health Infectious diseases Global development Science Medical research Vaccines and immunisation World news Source Type: news
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Source: New Scientist - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: research
Condition:   Rabies Interventions:   Biological: ChAdOx2 RabG;   Biological: Inactivated Rabies Vaccine Sponsor:   University of Oxford Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
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Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
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