Non-covalent glycosylated gold nanoparticles/peptides nanovaccine as potential cancer vaccines

Publication date: Available online 17 October 2019Source: Chinese Chemical LettersAuthor(s): Liming Zeng, Zonglang Liao, Wenwei Li, Qijuan Yuan, Peng Wu, Zhipeng Gu, Zhongqiu Liu, Guochao LiaoAbstractHerein, we firstly developed a non-covalent glycosylated gold nanoparticles/peptides nanovaccine which is assembled by β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based host-guest recognitions. This nanovaccine can generate significant titers of antibodies and improve the therapeutic effect against melanoma, suggesting the immunogenicity of peptide antigens can be improved by loading with this carrier. The novel vaccine carrier provides a platform for the transport of various antigens especially T cell-independent antigens.Graphical abstractNon-covalent glycosylated gold nanoparticles/peptides nanovaccine has been firstly developed via β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based host-guest assembled and indicated great potential for cancer therapy
Source: Chinese Chemical Letters - Category: Chemistry Source Type: research

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ConclusionsThis 5-year analysis represents the longest phase III follow-up for checkpoint inhibitor combination therapy and demonstrates long-term survival with both NIVO-containing arms vs IPI. In descriptive analyses, NIVO+IPI was associated with improved survival and a higher likelihood of being alive and treatment-free compared with NIVO alone, both without loss of QoL.Clinical trial identificationNCT01844505.Editorial acknowledgementWriting and editorial assistance was provided by Melissa Kirk, PhD, and Michele Salernitano of StemScientific, an Ashfield Company.Legal entity responsible for the studyBristol-Myers Squib...
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: American Journal of Clinical Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
Personalized cancer vaccines hold promises for future cancer therapy. Targeting neoantigens is perceived as more beneficial compared to germline, non-mutated antigens. However, it is a practical challenge to identify and vaccinate patients with neoantigens. Here we asked whether two neoantigens are sufficient, and whether the addition of germline antigens would enhance the therapeutic efficacy. We developed and used a personalized cancer nano-vaccine platform based on virus-like particles loaded with toll-like receptor ligands. We generated three sets of multi-target vaccines [MTV] to immunize against the aggressive B16F10...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Cancer is still a leading cause of death worldwide, while most chemotherapies induce non-selective toxicity and severe systemic side effects. To address these problems, targeted nanoscience is an emerging field that promises to benefit cancer patients. Gold nanoparticles are nowadays in the spotlight due to their many well-established advantages. Gold nanoparticles are easily synthesizable in various shapes and sizes by a continuously developing set of means, including chemical, physical or eco-friendly biological methods. This review presents gold nanoparticles as versatile therapeutic agents playing man...
Source: Current Medicinal Chemistry - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Curr Med Chem Source Type: research
Marjolein Schluck1,2, Roel Hammink1,2, Carl G. Figdor1,2,3, Martijn Verdoes1,3*† and Jorieke Weiden1,2,3*† 1Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2Division of Immunotherapy, Oncode Institute, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands 3Institute for Chemical Immunology, Nijmegen, Netherlands Traditional tumor vaccination approaches mostly focus on activating dendritic cells (DCs) by providing them with a source of tumor antigens and/or adjuvants, which in turn activate tumor-reactive T c...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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