Tuberculosis Infections Declining, But Not Fast Enough Among Poor, Marginalised: UN Health Agency

A 25 year-old tuberculosis patient is treated at her home in Funafuti, the main island of Tuvalu in the South Pacific. Credit: UNDP Tuvalu/Aurélia Rusek.By External SourceUNITED NATIONS, Oct 17 2019 (IPS) A staggering 1.5 million people died from tuberculosis (TB) last year, the UN health agency said on Thursday, in an appeal for far greater funding and political support to eradicate the curable and preventable disease. Caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, TB commonly causes persistent coughing, fatigue and weight loss. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) and its latest Global TB Report, around 10 million people developed TB in 2018 and three million sufferers “are not getting the care they need”. Countries where people suffer most are China, India, Indonesia, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, and South Africa. Although the 2018 TB toll was marginally better than in 2017, the burden remains stubbornly high among poor and marginalized populations, particularly those with HIV Highlighting some good news, WHO also pointed out that Brazil, China, the Russian Federation and Zimbabwe – all of which have high TB burdens – achieved treatment coverage levels of more than 80 per cent, in 2018. Nonetheless, although the 2018 TB toll was marginally better than in 2017, the burden remains stubbornly high among poor and marginalized populations, particularly those with HIV. One of the reasons for this is the cost of TB care, with...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Local TV Source Type: news
Each year, World Tuberculosis Day brings another reminder that an airborne scourge is the top infectious killer worldwide despite being preventable and curable. An estimated 1.8 million people died in 2015 of the disease, which has a 90 percent cure rate if treated. The growth of drug-resistant strains has experts worried that decades of progress in the fight could be erased. And the World Health Organization estimates there is a $2 billion investment gap in the efforts of low- and middle-income countries to fight tuberculosis each year, as well as a $1.3 billion shortfall in research and development. But despite tho...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
WASHINGTON ― When Baltimore resident Arjun kisses his 6-year-old daughter’s forehead, it’s not always just a sign of affection. His daughter, Sujata, is onto him. “Is that a temperature kiss?” she asks. Arjun compulsively checks his little girl’s temperature for a reason. Sujata is the survivor of the “first well-described case” of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a young child in the U.S., according to her physicians. Tuberculosis is the world’s biggest killer among infectious diseases, and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis ― or XDR-TB, which is re...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
An estimated 10 ·4 million people worldwide developed tuberculosis in 2015. Tuberculosis is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, with 1·8 million deaths, more than HIV/AIDS and malaria combined.1 In 2015, 580 000 (5·7%) patients with tuberculosis had rifampicin-resistant or multidrug-resistant (MDR ; resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin) disease, with India and China having the greatest number of these cases.1 Improved living standards in China have led to global gains in tuberculosis control in the past 20 years, particularly in the western Pacific region.
Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Comment Source Type: research
On February 8, the day before the White House sent its Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 budget request to Congress, President Obama requested $1.8 billion in emergency funding to respond to the Zika virus at home and abroad. The World Health Organization (WHO) has proclaimed Zika a “public health emergency of international concern,” and governments have been in panic mode. But while there is certainly sufficient cause for alarm, let us not forget another grave threat to public health, which kills 4,400 people every single day and receives relatively little focus: Tuberculosis (TB). TB has now surpassed HIV/AIDS as the lea...
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The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria provides over three-quarters of all international financing towards TB programs with US$4.7 billion disbursed, supporting provision of treatment for 13.2 million patients with smear-positive TB and 210 000 patients with multidrug-resistant TB in over 100 countries since 2002. In 2013, the Global Fund launched a new funding model that, among others, is advancing strategic investments to maximize impact, addressing ‘missing’ TB cases, enhancing a synergistic response to TB/HIV dual epidemics, and building resilient and sustainable systems for health. A new G...
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WASHINGTON -- Less than two months after unveiling a plan to fight multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, President Barack Obama has proposed cutting the U.S. Agency for International Development's funding to combat the world's No. 1 infectious killer -- by 19 percent. This will be the fourth budget in a row from the Obama administration that calls for a 19 percent cut to tuberculosis funding at USAID. In each of the previous years, Congress rejected that reduction. If lawmakers approve this week's funding proposal -- at $191 million, down from $236 million last year -- it would be the lowest level of s...
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