Factors associated with adverse outcomes during influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities.

Factors associated with adverse outcomes during influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2019 Oct 16;: Authors: Tennant E, Fletcher S, Kakar S, Najjar Z, Lord H, Clark P, Gupta L Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore factors associated with adverse outcomes during influenza outbreaks in residential aged care facilities. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all outbreaks reported to three Sydney metropolitan Public Health Units during 2017. RESULTS: A total of 123 outbreaks affected 1,787 residents and 543 staff. Early notification to a Public Health Unit was associated with shorter outbreak duration (p
Source: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Public Health Source Type: research

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The objective of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness and budget impact of the influenza vaccination policy for prisoners in Thailand. The study obtained data from the Division of Epidemiology, Department of Disease Control (DDC), MOPH. Deterministic system dynamic modelling was exercised to estimate the financial implication of the vaccination programme in comparison with routine outbreak control. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated via a DDC perspective. The reproductive number was estimated at 1.4. A total of 143 prisons across the country (375,763 prisoners) were analysed. In non-v...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: Journal of Theoretical BiologyAuthor(s): Kyeongah Nah, Mahnaz Alavinejad, Ashrafur Rahman, Jane M Heffernan, Jianhong WuAbstractGenerally, vaccines are designed to provide protection against infection (susceptibility), disease (symptoms and transmissibility), and/or complications. In a recent study of influenza vaccination, it was observed that vaccinated yet infected individuals experienced increased transmission levels. In this paper, using a mathematical model of infection and transmission, we study the impact of vaccine-modified effects, including susceptibility...
Source: Journal of Theoretical Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: research
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
Once in a very rare while, a single, serious challenge consumes the attention of the entire world. We are living through one such period today as countries and communities come together to end the new coronavirus outbreak. This virus, provisionally known as the “2019-novel coronavirus,” has, as of 3 February 2020, spread to 24 countries, with over 17,000 people being infected to date, 99% of them in China. The limited numbers of cases elsewhere around the world – just 153 so far – show that efforts to contain the virus in China are curbing its global spread, alongside the detection and clinical care...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health ideas Source Type: news
We were surprised in 2002 when a new coronavirus called SARS emerged from southern China and spread to 17 countries, causing more than 8,000 disease cases and nearly 800 deaths. We were surprised in 2009 when a new H1N1 influenza strain emerged in Mexico and caused worldwide panic. We were surprised in 2014 when Ebola virus broke out in three West African countries, with nearly 30,000 cases and more than 11,000 deaths. And here we are now, facing the 2019-nCoV coronavirus outbreak, on the verge of becoming a worldwide pandemic, wthin China reporting over 20,000 cases and nearly 500 deaths. Three years ago in a book, Deadl...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Many Americans likely grew a little nervous after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced Thursday that a novel coronavirus has spread for the first time within the U.S. But agency officials and other doctors have a simple message for Americans: keep doing what you’re doing to stay healthy. “The best things that you can do are the things that we generally recommend at this time of year to prevent the spread of infectious diseases,” Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said during a Jan. 30 call with reporters. “W...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV public health Source Type: news
More than 8,000 people worldwide have been infected, and 171 have been killed, by a novel coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China last month. But early research out of Wuhan suggests one group has been largely spared by the contagious disease: young children. A paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday analyzed characteristics of 425 of the first people in Wuhan infected by the virus known as 2019-nCoV and found that none were younger than 15. The median age of patients was 59, and, at least as of mid-January, the youngest person to die from the disease was 36. Though there are not good data t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
Abstract The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses and their spillover into the human population pose substantial economic and public health threats. Although antiviral drugs have some effect in treating influenza infection, vaccination is still the most effective intervention to prevent possible pandemic outbreaks. We have developed a novel H5 influenza vaccine to improve the world's pandemic preparedness. We produced a hemagglutinin (HA) of HPAI H5N1 virus A/Alberta/01/2014 (AB14) using both mammalian (m) and bacterial (b) expression systems. The purified recombinant proteins were formulated with...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
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