What isn't measured isn't done - eight years with no progress in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult influenza and pneumococcal vaccination.

CONCLUSIONS: Indigenous adult vaccination coverage for influenza and pneumococcal disease remains unacceptably low. Between 2004-05 and 2012-13, declines occurred in pneumococcal vaccination coverage across all age groups ≥18 years. Despite national funding of influenza vaccine in 2010, there was no increase in influenza coverage, except for the 18-49-year age group. Implications for public health: Current approaches to promote, deliver and monitor vaccination of Indigenous adults are inadequate. PMID: 31617660 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Public Health Source Type: research

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This study explored the feasibility of a novel reporter gene assay (RGA) for pyrogen detection using RAW264.7 cells stably transfected with the NF-κB reporter gene as a pyrogenic marker. The RGA could detect different types of pyrogens, including the lipopolysaccharide of gram-negative bacteria, the lipoteichoic acid of gram-positive bacteria, and the zymosan of fungi, and a good dose-effect relationship was observed in terms of NF-κB activity. The limits of detection of the RGA to those pyrogens were 0.03 EU/ml, 0.001 μg/ml, and 1μg/ml, respectively. The method had good precision and accuracy and could b...
Source: Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Jpn J Infect Dis Source Type: research
Abstract Vaccination coverage among older adults is low in the United States. A recommendation from a provider is a strong predictor of vaccine receipt. Using Medicare Fee-For-Service data (2015-2017) this study characterized providers by the number of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines administered in physician offices, age, gender, and professional specialty to determine the volume of vaccines provided by individual providers and characteristics of these providers. Half of all vaccinations were provided by 10% of providers. The mean age of 224,483 and 165,710 unique influenza and pneumococcal providers respecti...
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
Opportunistic infections are those that are either more frequent or more severe as a result of the patient’s immunosuppressed condition. Opportunistic infections are, of course, the distinguishing feature of HIV infection, and they can be the cause of serious morbidity and even mortality. Some opportunistic infections can be prevented by vaccination, for example, pneumococcal infection, meningococcal infection, influenza, hepatitis A and B, and varicella. Other major opportunistic infections require prophylactic antibiotics or antiviral medications. In obstetric patients, pneumocystis infections and toxoplasmosis are...
Source: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: New Antibiotics and Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetrics Source Type: research
Authors: Agrawal R, Moghtader S, Ayyala U, Bandi V, Sharafkhaneh A Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major chronic debilitating condition with significant impact on quality of life, symptoms, comorbidity, health care utilization and longevity. The main pathophysiological hallmark of COPD is expiratory flow limitation which impairs the ability of respiratory system to adequately and properly ventilate. To be able to prognosticate and manage patients with COPD, various societies have developed classifications of disease severity. Current classification schemes combine three elements that incl...
Source: Journal of Thoracic Disease - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Thorac Dis Source Type: research
ConclusionsSOPs may provide a good starting point for increasing adult immunization coverage rates. Using additional interventions, quality-based metrics, or incentives could lead to sustained adult immunization prioritization.
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Clinics and Research in Hepatology and GastroenterologyAuthor(s): Florent Valour, Anne Conrad, Florence Ader, Odile LaunaySummaryIn patients with chronic liver disease and liver transplant recipients, cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction syndrome and immunosuppressant drug regimens required to prevent graft rejection lead to a high risk of severe infections, associated with acute liver decompensation, graft loss and increased mortality. In addition to maintain their global health status, vaccination represents a major preventive measure against specific infectiou...
Source: Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Purpose of review Kidney transplant recipients are at high risk of contracting infections, some of which are considered vaccine-preventable, because of their highly immunosuppressed state. In this vulnerable group of patients, infection can lead to poor outcomes including graft failure and death, thus vaccination in the posttransplant population is an important strategy in order to mitigate this risk. The present review is aimed at providing an update on recent advances with respect to vaccination strategies in kidney transplant recipients. Recent findings General principles behind vaccination in kidney transplantatio...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: DIALYSIS AND TRANSPLANTATION: Edited by Anil Chandraker and J. Kevin Tucker Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2019Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Karen M. Krueger, Michael G. Ison, Cybele GhosseinInfection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including those receiving maintenance dialysis or with a kidney transplant. Although responses to vaccines are impaired in these populations, immunizations remain an important component of preventative care due to their favorable safety profiles and the high rate of infection in these patients. Most guidelines for patients with CKD focus on the importance of the hepatitis B...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Different abnormalities account for the increased risk of viral and bacterial infection in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Main irregularities include: decreased CD4/CD8 lymphocyte ratios, reduced monocyte phagocytic function and defects in interleukin-2 production [1 –6]. Individuals with DM are 6 time more likely to be hospitalized and 3 times more likely to die from complications of influenza or pneumonia when compared to those in general population [7]. People with DM have higher rates of hepatitis B due to contact with infected blood or through improper eq uipment use (glucose monitoring devices or infected needles) [8].
Source: Primary Care Diabetes - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Original research Source Type: research
Authors: Autran B Abstract The aging population raises a number of public health issues including a need to address the severity and frequency of infections observed in older people. Vaccines play an important role in prevention. However, immunosenescence alters the intensity and quality of vaccine responses, thus limiting the impact of recommendations directed after 65 years for vaccination against flu, pneumococci, pertussis, tetanus and zoster. Immunosenescence, aggravated by co-morbidities, varies with age, becoming apparent after 60-65 years and more profound after 85 years. All stages of vaccine responses are...
Source: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Rev Mal Respir Source Type: research
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