Non-invasive prediction of liver related events in HCV compensated advanced chronic liver disease patients after oral antivirals

Direct-acting antivirals (DAA) have become the new standard of care for patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, demonstrating to be highly effective in achieving sustained virological response (SVR) rates regardless of HCV-genotype. Due to their safety profile and low side effects any patient in any stage of chronic liver disease (from mild fibrosis to decompensated cirrhosis) can be treated with DAA [1]. Therefore, it is important to know which patients will be prone to develop liver-related complications, such hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or liver decompensation, and will need a lifelong follow up and which ones will have a good prognosis so they could be safely discharged from follow up.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research

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THE GORDON WILSON LECTURE: THE HEPATITIS C VIRUS: FROM HIPPOCRATES TO CURE. Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc. 2019;130:104-118 Authors: Alter HJ Abstract The modern age of viral hepatitis began in the early 1960s with the serendipitous discovery of the Australia antigen, a protein that was later shown to represent the envelope of the hepatitis B virus leading to its designation as the hepatitis B surface antigen. This was the first marker for any hepatitis virus and became not only a diagnostic assay, but also a mandatory blood donor screening test and the basis for the first generation hepatitis B vaccine...
Source: Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association - Category: General Medicine Tags: Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The included trials lacked data on all-cause mortality, health-related quality of life, serious adverse events, hepatitis-B related mortality, and hepatitis-B related morbidity. The evidence on the effect of Radix Sophorae flavescentis on the proportion of participants with adverse events considered 'not to be serious' and on the proportion of participants with detectable HBV-DNA is still unclear. We advise caution regarding the results of Radix Sophorae flavescentis showing a reduction in the proportion of people with detectable HBeAg because the trials were at high risk of bias, because it is a non-validated...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Conclusion Massive SI and immune cell paralysis associated with ACLF represent the extreme severity of CAID in response to an infectious or sterile challenge. The severe immune disturbance plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the distinctive features of ACLF: organ failure and bacterial infection susceptibility. Excessive SI in ACLF results from the massive activation and dysfunction of an innate immune system challenged by increased PAMPs and DAMPs. SI leads to cell and tissue immunopathology contributing to hepatic and extrahepatic organ failure. Concomitantly, the course of ACLF is associated with a disproportio...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Conclusion: In conclusion, Baishouwu extract exhibited potent effect on the development of HCC by altering TLR4/MyD88/ NF-κB signaling pathway in the sequence of hepatic inflammation-fibrosis-cancer, which provided novel insights into the mechanism of Baishouwu extract as a candidate for the pretreatment of HCC in the future. Introduction Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world and the third cause of cancer-related deaths (Jemal et al., 2011). Chronic inflammation, caused by chemical, biological and physical factors, is found to be related to certain human cancers. The effe...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The included trials lacked data on health-related quality of life, hepatitis B-related mortality, and hepatitis B-related morbidity. The effects of Radix Sophorae flavescentis on all-cause mortality and on the proportion of participants with serious adverse events and adverse events considered 'not to be serious' remain unclear. We advise caution in interpreting results showing that Radix Sophorae flavescentis reduced the proportion of people with detectable HBV-DNA and detectable HBeAg because the trials reporting on these outcomes are at high risk of bias and both outcomes are non-validated surrogate outcome...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Authors: Wei L, Huang YH Abstract INTRODUCTION: Within the past decade, antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has evolved from interferon (IFN)-based regimens to IFN-free oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, data on long-term outcomes in HCV patients treated by DAAs are limited and complex. This review summarizes the literature on long-term outcomes in patients with chronic HCV infection who received IFN-based and DAA treatment. Areas covered: Original studies and meta-analyses reporting data on the impacts of IFN- and DAA-based treatments on late relapse, liver fibrosis/...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, with> 71 million people infected worldwide in 2015 [1]. In 2013, an estimated 700,000 deaths globally were attributed to HCV-related liver disease sequelae, namely cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma [2]. Mortality is expected to increase as many individuals infected with HCV decades ago are aging and at high risk of chronic liver disease [3,4]. With the introduction of highly effective and well-tolerated, all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies to treat chronic HCV infection[5,6], there has been renewed optimism regardin...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Abstract The International Conference on Viral Hepatitis 2017 brought exciting news on the treatment of viral hepatitis. The most recent estimates of the burden for hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections were presented. The current gaps and prospects for regional and global eradication of viral hepatitis were discussed on the light of the WHO roadmap until 2030. Debates focused on hepatitis C and expectations using the new approved HCV pan-genotypic, once daily, oral direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), glecaprevir-pibrentasvir, and sofosbuvir-velpatasvir-voxilaprevir. The management of difficult-to-...
Source: AIDS Reviews - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: AIDS Rev Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our results show the complexity and rapid progression of end-stage liver disease associated with HCV infection. The considerable loss of life expectancy associated with the development of decompensated cirrhosis in patients with chronic HCV infection in the absence of viral clearance through treatment is acutely evident. PMID: 28946785 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Authors: Kim BK, Jang ES, Kim JH, Park SY, Ahn SV, Kim HJ, Kim DY Abstract Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV infection causes acute hepatitis, and the majority of those infected progress to chronic hepatitis, and some of them develop cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Transmission of HCV is parenteral, and the major transmission routes include drug abuse, insecure injections or medical procedures, contaminated syringes or needles, sexual contact with an HCV-infected person, vertical infection of newborns by infected mothers, the transfusion of blood or blood products...
Source: Clinical and molecular hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Clin Mol Hepatol Source Type: research
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