Effective Second-Line Treatment for Mesothelioma Gaining Ground

Doctors at the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research in Zurich, Switzerland, have uncovered a novel, anti-tumor compound that could become a needed second-line treatment for pleural mesothelioma cancer. Their recent multicenter phase II clinical trial conducted in Switzerland and Italy revealed the safety and efficacy of lurbinectedin, a synthetically produced agent that inhibits the growth of mesothelioma cells. “We believe this could represent a new treatment option for pleural mesothelioma,” Dr. Yannis Metaxas, oncologist at Kantonsspital Graubunden outside Zurich, told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “It could prove eventually to be a real breakthrough. This was a good first step, and the results were quite impressive.” Metaxas presented his group’s findings at the European Society for Medical Oncology conference earlier this month in Barcelona, Spain. There currently is no standard treatment for patients with unresectable mesothelioma that inevitably progresses after chemotherapy. In May, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tumor Treating Fields — the first new treatment approval for mesothelioma in 15 years – but usefulness remains in question as a second-line treatment. “There is a real need here,” Metaxas said. “We don’t know yet if it [lurbinectedin] can be more effective than current standard of care, but we do know it is active against these tumor cells.” Survival Times...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news

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A mesothelioma patient at West Cancer Center in Memphis, Tennessee, is the first in the country to use NovoTTF-100L, a noninvasive electric therapy treatment, since its approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May. The FDA’s approval of Novocure’s Tumor Treating Fields device for the treatment of mesothelioma marked the first new FDA-approved treatment option for the rare asbestos-related cancer in more than 15 years. NovoTTF-100L uses a low-voltage electrical field that is distributed with three pads attached to the front and back of a person’s chest. The electrical current is designed to di...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
AbstractBackgroundTumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are a non-invasive, antimitotic therapy delivered to the tumor via transducer arrays applied to the skin at tumor site. The only TTFields-related adverse event (AE) reported in clinical trials was localized dermatitis beneath the arrays. The safety of TTFields has also been investigated in glioblastoma, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), mesothelioma, pancreatic and ovarian cancer. This meta-analysis reported AEs in clinical studies with TTFields torso delivery.Methods192 patients from 4 pilot studies were included in the analysis: EF-15 (n  = 41, advanced N...
Source: Annals of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
A research team from the Duke University Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has uncovered a new compound with potential to make chemotherapy more effective in treating various cancers. The small-molecule inhibitor drug — JH-RE-06 — showed an ability to better-sensitize tumors to Cisplatin, the popular chemotherapy drug most often used for mesothelioma cancer patients. When combined with Cisplatin, the drug also showed an ability to prevent those tumor cells from becoming treatment resistant, a common problem with this rare cancer caused by asbestos exposure. The research was done on l...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have opened a much-anticipated clinical trial involving a novel T-cell therapy for patients with mesothelioma. The two institutions are establishing dosage levels and measuring efficacy of TC-210, a type of immunotherapy that targets mesothelin, a cell surface protein highly expressed in several cancers. The study also is open to patients with certain types of bile duct, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer. Participation is based upon individual levels of mesothelin expression. Researchers at the two centers are hoping to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusions This review describes how leukocyte-heparanase can be a double-edged sword in tumor progression; it can enhance tumor immune surveillance and tumor cell clearance, but also promote tumor survival and growth. We also discuss the potential of using heparanase in leukocyte therapies against tumors, and the effects of heparanase inhibitors on tumor progression and immunity. We are just beginning to understand the influence of heparanase on a pro/anti-tumor immune response, and there are still many questions to answer. How do the pro/anti-tumorigenic effects of heparanase differ across different cancer types? Does...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Joe Abdo1, Christopher S. Wichman2, Nicholas E. Dietz1,3, Pawel Ciborowski4, John Fleegel1, Sumeet K. Mittal1,5 and Devendra K. Agrawal1* 1Department of Clinical and Translational Science, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 2Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 3Department of Pathology, CHI Health Creighton University Medical Center, College of Medicine, Omaha, NE, United States 4Department of Pharmacology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States 5Norton Thoracic Institute, St....
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Doctors in China may have uncovered an effective second- or third-line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Dr. RongQin Meng, an oncologist at 363 Hospital in Cheng Du, said the investigational drug Apatinib (rivoceranib) could become part of a much-needed advance in mesothelioma treatment. After first- and second-line chemotherapy combinations had failed to slow tumor growth in a 58-year-old woman, Apatinib provided a five-month progression-free survival. “I was surprised at the result,” Meng told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “After taking the drug, the quality o...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
The National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, has opened an innovative clinical trial for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma that will explore the safety and effectiveness of a novel CAR T-cell therapy. The phase I trial also is being conducted at Washington University in St. Louis. It is aimed at patients whose disease has relapsed after initial chemotherapy treatment. It involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that can help the immune system kill the cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of gene therapy that has been highly successful with blood...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
ConclusionConsidering the patient ’s occupational and environmental history, it is estimated that she had been exposed to asbestos significantly, so we determined that ovarian cancer in the patient is highly correlated with the occupational exposure of asbestos and environmental exposure is a possible cause as well. Social devices are needed to prevent further exposure to asbestos. It is also necessary to recognize that ovarian cancer can occur in workers who have previously been exposed to asbestos, and the education and social compensation for those workers are needed.
Source: Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research
Standard-of-care treatment for patients with pleural mesothelioma may soon include Tumor Treating Fields (TTF), a novel therapy involving electric currents that disrupt cancer cell division and inhibit tumor growth. In the wake of recently released results from Novocure’s STELLAR phase II clinical trial, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is expected to approve the treatment within the next six months, giving mesothelioma patients another much-needed option. “At this point, it should be a relatively rapid approval process,” Dr. Eilon Kirson, chief science officer at Novocure, the oncology company...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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