Potential Airborne Asbestos Exposure and Risk Associated with the Historical Use of Cosmetic Talcum Powder Products

AbstractOver time, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for human exposure and risk from asbestos in cosmetic ‐talc–containing consumer products. In 1985, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted a risk assessment evaluating the potential inhalation asbestos exposure associated with the cosmetic talc consumer use scenario of powdering an infant during diapering, and found that risks were be low levels associated with background asbestos exposures and risk. However, given the scope and age of the FDA's assessment, it was unknown whether the agency's conclusions remained relevant to current risk assessment practices, talc application scenarios, and exposure data. This analysis updates th e previous FDA assessment by incorporating the current published exposure literature associated with consumer use of talcum powder and using the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) nonoccupational asbestos risk assessment approach to estimate potential cumulative asbestos exposure a nd risk for four use scenarios: (1) infant exposure during diapering; (2) adult exposure from infant diapering; (3) adult exposure from face powdering; and (4) adult exposure from body powdering. The estimated range of cumulative asbestos exposure potential for all scenarios (assuming an asbestos co ntent of 0.1%) ranged from 0.0000021 to 0.0096 f/cc‐yr and resulted in risk estimates that were within or below EPA's acceptable target risk levels. Consistent with th...
Source: Risk Analysis - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research

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Risk Analysis, Volume 39, Issue 12, Page 2601-2603, December 2019.
Source: Risk Analysis - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] (CDC NIOSH). Published: 8/2019. In March 2018, an employer representative with a government agency for the State of California requested a health hazard evaluation concerning exposure to silica, asbestos, metals, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons during cleanup of structural debris and burn ash after wildfires spread into areas where homes and business were located. This 54-page report summarizes work that measured employees ’ exposures to respirable crystalline silica, asbestos, metals, and polyaromatic hydrocarbo...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] (CDC NIOSH). Published: 6/2019. This 32-page health hazard evaluation report was written in response to a request by management at a federal forest management agency, which was concerned about wildland fire fighters ’ exposures to asbestos during prescribed burns near a former vermiculite mine. Key findings include: exposures to total fibers in air were less than the lowest occupational exposure limit, decontamination line procedures could be improved, and the respiratory protection program could be strengthe ned. (PDF)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
AbstractOver time, concerns have been raised regarding the potential for human exposure and risk from asbestos in cosmetic ‐talc–containing consumer products. In 1985, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted a risk assessment evaluating the potential inhalation asbestos exposure associated with the cosmetic talc consumer use scenario of powdering an infant during diapering, and found that risks were be low levels associated with background asbestos exposures and risk. However, given the scope and age of the FDA's assessment, it was unknown whether the agency's conclusions remained relevant to current ...
Source: Risk Analysis - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
Conclusion The operationalization of firework public display in India is in a fragmented state and requires urgent attention to avoid disasters in the short and long run. The ‘foreman’s certificate’ is issued by the Controller of Explosive to a person who is conversant with safe manufacture, storage, transportation, handling of explosives. Explosive rules have not made it clear as to what kind of educational qualifications and training must be possessed by a person before he makes an application for ‘foreman’s certificate’. The basic chemistry of explosives and professional training on f...
Source: PLOS Currents Disasters - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Introduction:  An Old Public Health MenaceThis is somewhat personal.  In the early 1980s, as a general internal medicine fellow, I gave a series of talks about important medical problems that generalist physicians often missed.  One was asbestos related disease.  Although asbestos had been heavily regulated since 1973, there were stilll large numbers of people exposed to it alive in the 1980s.  One of my primitive slides, seemingly a picture of type writing, stated that around then, 2 to 4 million people who had histories of significant asbestos exposure were likely alive.  Asbestos is known t...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: asbestos cancer conflicts of interest Donald Trump public health Source Type: blogs
The recent suicides of highly regarded fashion designer Kate Spade and television celebrity chef and author Anthony Bourdain remind us this mental health crisis can touch anyone. Cancer patients are no exception. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide rates between 1999 and 2016 have risen more than 30 percent in half of the country and by nearly 60 percent in some states. This trend is particularly worrisome for cancer patients because this group has a higher suicide risk than the general public. For mesothelioma patients and the people who care for them, one part of this picture deser...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
If you have mesothelioma and you’ve already received standard-of-care therapies, you may be considering an immunotherapy clinical trial. If you’re considering this option, a free immunotherapy teleconference is a great place to learn more. CancerCare recently hosted two one-hour education workshops featuring panels of immunotherapy experts. Part I of the teleconference presented an overview of immunotherapy. Part II of the teleconference, which is available online for free, focused exclusively on immunotherapy side effects. Understanding these issues and the role each patient plays in managing their own side ef...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Every year, mesothelioma specialists and researchers make strides to advance the standard of care, improve treatment strategies and develop new diagnostic practices. Mesothelioma remains a rare cancer, with an estimated 3,000 people diagnosed each year in the U.S., but the fight to find a cure only grows stronger. And while researchers are busy finding breakthroughs in care, advocates are hard at work campaigning for a ban on asbestos, the main cause of mesothelioma. This was a memorable year on both fronts. Immunotherapy continues to be the hot topic among emerging treatments. Drugs such as pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and ni...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: canada asbestos ban Food and Drug Administration Furthering Asbestos Claims Transparency Act keytruda Medical marijuana mesothelioma mesothelioma vaccine Opdivo Scott Pruitt talcum powder lawsuit yervoy Source Type: news
Six major wildfires are torching Southern California, covering an area larger than New York City and Boston combined. The Thomas Fire — the largest of the six and the fifth-largest blaze in modern California history — covers 238,500 acres. The other fires have destroyed nearly 260,000 acres, officials said. At least 18,000 homes and other structures are threatened by the fires and more than 1,000 structures have been wiped out, according to the fire protection agency Cal Fire. Cal Fire officials said the Thomas Fire was 30 percent contained as of late Wednesday. Some residents have been allowed back in their ho...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Air Pollution Control District asbestos exposure Cal Fire California Department of Toxic Substances Control Charles Conway Karen Relucio Napa County Richard Belkin Ridley-Tree Cancer Center Santa Barbara County Sonoma County Thomas F Source Type: news
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