Is there really a blood test to diagnose concussion?

In the past year and a half, various news stories may have led some people to believe that there are blood tests that can diagnose or unmask concussions with a single drop of blood. For individuals who have recently received a bump, hit, or jolt to the head and are wondering if they have sustained a concussion, this may sound like a simple way to find out. Unfortunately, for now it probably isn’t. What do these blood tests actually do? Simply put, these tests measure substances, such as proteins and enzymes, that are released into the blood within hours of a brain injury when there is intracranial damage (including bleeding in the brain). Such brain damage is often observable via a CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan. If the levels of these substances are below certain cutoff values, this suggests that no such observable intracranial damage has occurred, and a scan can be safely avoided. Therefore, these tests hold promise for avoiding unnecessary imaging scans, saving on medical costs, and — importantly — avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure from CT scans. As these tests evolve, they may prove to be more sensitive than CT scans at determining intracranial damage. What happens when a person seeks treatment for a traumatic brain injury (TBI)? When someone experiences a trauma to the head and a possible brain injury is suspected, they are often taken to a trauma center or ER. Physicians need to determine fairly quickly whether ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Concussions Memory Neurological conditions Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

ConclusionWithin the limitations of the study, GBR with or without autogenous block graft may be an effective approach in augmenting horizontally deficient mandibular or maxillary ridges, before the placement of dental implants. However, more complications may be seen with the use of an autogenous block graft related to the donor sites.
Source: Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
ConclusionThe authors recommended short implants whenever the height of available bone permits optimum implant placement. The authors concluded that both treatment options are considered viable clinically and radiographically. However, short implants have shown reduced postoperative discomfort, minimal invasiveness, and reduced cost.
Source: Journal of Evidence Based Dental Practice - Category: Dentistry Source Type: research
In conclusion, this study presents the novel finding that the PVS periductium is composed of squamous MCs. These cells tightly line the luminal surface of the PVS tissue, including PNs, PVs, and small branches of the PVs in the abdominal cavity. These results will help researchers understand the role of the PVS in hyaluronan secretion, tissue repair, inflammation, and tumorigenesis, as well as the fine structure of PVS tissue.
Source: Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 November 2019Source: Materials Today: ProceedingsAuthor(s): Vijay Kumar Chavan, M. SreenivasuluAbstractVanadium ion doped zinc lead lithium phosphate glass samples are prepared by melt quench method. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the amorphous nature of all the prepared glasses. The density and refractive index values of these glasses are evaluated using the Archimedes method and Abbe’s refractometer respectively. The values of density found to be in between 3.6363 and 3.6666 g/cm3. The refractive index values are observed in the range 1.5605–1.5620. An increasing t...
Source: Materials Today: Proceedings - Category: Materials Science Source Type: research
Headaches are very common in children. By the time they reach 18, essentially all kids will have had at least one. Most children get them rarely, usually with an illness. But some children get recurrent headaches. About 5% of kindergartners experience this problem, and the percentage goes up as children get older. By the time they get to the end of high school, that number is up to more than 25%. Recurrent headaches often run in families. There are two types: primary and secondary. Primary headaches come from the nervous system itself, while secondary headaches are caused by something affecting the nervous system, such as ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Headache Source Type: blogs
Discussion Basilar skulls fractures are relatively common occurring in 4-20% of all skull fractures. Motor vehicle accidents, significant falls from heights and blunt trauma are the most common causes of basilar skull fractures. Basilar skulls fractures are even less common in children than adults. Complications can include meningitis, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, cranial nerve injuries or even potentially death. With more significant trauma to the head and body, it is not surprising that complications are more likely. Nasoethmoid facial fractures have similar common mechanisms of injury including motor vehicle accid...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
There has been lots of attention on concussions in youth, especially from sports, over the past few years. It’s good that we are paying more attention to concussions. As the stories of prior National Football League players show us, concussions can lead to lifelong problems. The problem for doctors, parents, and coaches has been that while we want to do the right thing when a child gets a concussion, we haven’t known what that right thing is. So it’s great news that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reviewed all the research and made recommendations to help guide us as we care for c...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Concussions Parenting Source Type: blogs
Ski season is here, and I am reminded of the story of Natasha Richardson (Liam Neeson’s wife), who tragically died of a head injury while skiing without a helmet in 2007. Here in the emergency department, we see many patients with concern for head injuries. We factor what may have caused the injury, your age, what we find when we examine you, the timing of the incident, the medicines you take, as well as some other factors, when deciding whether to do a CT scan or admit you to the hospital. When a head injury causes bleeding in the brain Ms. Richardson died of an epidural hematoma, one of several types of brain bleed...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Brain and cognitive health Injuries Prevention Safety Source Type: blogs
CHICAGO (AP) — Continuing to play despite a concussion doubles recovery time for teen athletes and leads to worse short-term mental function than in those immediately removed from action, a study found. It’s billed as the first to compare recovery outcomes for athletes removed from a game or practice compared with those who aren’t. The study was small, involving 69 teens treated at a University of Pittsburgh Medical Center concussion clinic, but the results bolster evidence supporting the growing number of return-to-play laws and policies nationwide The study was published Monday in the journal Pediatrics...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Heard On WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Local Watch Listen Carl Stevens Concussions Source Type: news
The latest in neuroscience—sorted and summarized for you Welcome to The Neuroscience Report where each week we will highlight a specific topic in neuroscience and provide you with links to 5 journal articles, 5 news articles, and 5 wildcard picks. Brought to you by Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience—your source for peer-reviewed, evidence-based information. This Week’s Topic: Traumatic Brain Injury Journal Articles Altered Cognitive Control Activations after Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Relationship to Injury Severity and Everyday-Life Function Is Routine Repeated Hea...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Epilepsy Headache Mood Disorders Neurologic Systems and Symptoms Patient Assessment Primary Care Psychiatry The Neuroscience Report Concussion TBI traumatic brain injury Source Type: research
More News: Bleeding | Blogging | Brain | Concussion | CT Scan | Harvard | Headache | Health | MRI Scan | Neurology | PET Scan