Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Risk of Birth Defects Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Risk of Birth Defects

Women with severe obesity who have gastric bypass surgery to lose weight before becoming pregnant may be less likely to have babies with birth defects than similar women who don't have weight-loss surgery, a new study suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass linked to better diabetes outcomes and weight loss compared with gastric sleeve Related items fromOnMedica Surgery a better option for obese diabetics Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Keep off lost weight for continued cardiometabolic benefit Diabetes drug use during pregnancy affects child's weight Vegan diet may help blood sugar control
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
;llertz A Abstract The release and absorption profile of an oral medication is influenced by the physicochemical properties of the drug and its formulation, as well as by the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During drug development the bioavailability of a new drug is typically assessed in early clinical studies in a healthy adult population. However, many disease conditions are associated with an alteration of the anatomy and/or physiology of the GI tract. The same holds true for some subpopulations, such as paediatric or elderly patients, or populations with different ethnicity. The var...
Source: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Eur J Pharm Sci Source Type: research
ConclusionAdministrative claim data can be analyzed through Formal Concept Analysis in order to classify trajectories of care. This approach permits to quantify expected postoperative complications and to identify unexpected events.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionObesity is closely associated with primary infertility and PCOD. Menstrual abnormalities associated with PCOD significantly improve after bariatric surgery with significant improvement in fertility along with maternal outcomes.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
(Reuters Health) - Women with severe obesity who have gastric bypass surgery to lose weight before becoming pregnant may be less likely to have babies with birth defects than similar women who don't have weight-loss surgery, a new study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Invagination of the small intestine during pregnancy in women with a history of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB) can cause maternal and foetal morbidity and even foetal mortality. Aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of invagination during pregnancy after LRYGB, the surgical treatment and the maternal and foetal outcomes. Methods: MEDLINE ®, Embase, Cochrane Library and our own hospital’s electronic health records were searched for studies/cases regarding 1) pregnant patient(s) with a history of LRYGB and 2) pregnancy(ies) complicated by invagination.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Pregnant women with a history of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) may develop acute abdominal pain related to the RYGB. Previous studies published alarming results regarding foetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Objective:  Aim of this study is to analyse these outcome parameters for patients referred to the emergency department (ED) of our specialised centre with a national referral function in the Netherlands.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Small bowel intussusception remains a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is almost always associated with a lead point (e.g., a small bowel polyp) [1]. However, there have been recent reports of small bowel intussusception occurring without a clear lead point in adults who have undergone a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery for management of obesity [1,2]. The current incidence reported in the literature is .07% –0.6%, occurring at an average of 36 months postoperatively, and it has been demonstrated in both men and pregnant and nonpregnant women [1–3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case report Source Type: research
Small bowel intussusception remains a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is almost always associated with a lead point, for example a small bowel polyp(1). However, there have been recent reports of small bowel intussusception occurring without a clear lead point in adults that have undergone a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery for management of obesity(1,2). The current incidence reported in the literature is 0.07% –0.6%, occurring at an average of 36 months postoperatively, and it has been demonstrated in both men and pregnant and non-pregnant women(1-3).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 August 2019Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Jérémie Thereaux, Thomas Lesuffleur, Sébastien Czernichow, Arnaud Basdevant, Simon Msika, David Nocca, Bertrand Millat, Anne Fagot-CampagnaSummaryBackgroundConcerns are rising about the late adverse events following gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. We aimed to assess, over a 7-year period, the late adverse events after gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy compared with matched control groups.MethodsIn this nationwide, observational, population-based, cohort study, we used data extracted from ...
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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