Nerve transfer as a novel treatment for West Nile virus-associated acute flaccid paralysis

West Nile virus-associated acute flaccid paralysis (WNV-AFP) is a well-known complication of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) [1,2]. Most cases of WNV-AFP occur as a result of anterior horn cell damage, resulting in a syndrome reminiscent of poliomyelitis. Brachial plexus involvement has been reported less commonly [3 –5]. At present, supportive care is the mainstay of treatment for all forms of WNND [2]. The prognosis for WNV-AFP is generally poor, and recovery, if any, usually occurs within six months of onset [6].
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

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We read with great interest the study by Saltzman et. al. on nerve transfers for acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) [1]. AFM refers to acute flaccid paralysis with focal/ asymmetric limb weakness and characteristic spinal gray matter lesions on imaging. Besides poliomyelitis, an array of viruses may be causative. These include Non-Polio Enteroviruses (NPEV- Enterovirus D-68&A-71, Coxsackie A and B), Arboviruses (West Nile virus, Japanese B encephalitis virus (JEV)), Herpes viruses (Herpes simplex 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, Ebstein Barr virus) etc.
Source: Pediatric Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
(NEW YORK) — More children have been diagnosed with a mysterious paralyzing illness in recent weeks, and U.S. health officials said Tuesday that they still aren’t sure what’s causing it. This year’s count could surpass the tallies seen in similar outbreaks in 2014 and 2016, officials said. Fortunately, the disease remains rare: This year, there have been 90 cases spread among 27 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. It’s not clear what’s causing some children to lose the ability to move their face, neck, back, arms or legs. The symptoms tend to occur about a week a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news
It is a scary illness, not just for parents but for doctors, too: Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) causes sudden weakness and loss of muscle tone in the arms and legs and can go on to cause even more serious problems. It’s not just the symptoms that are scary. It’s also scary because we don’t know what causes it. Although the symptoms are similar to polio, patients with AFM have tested negative for polio. At one point it was thought that it was caused by another enterovirus, but that didn’t end up being the explanation. It may be another virus, or it may be some sort of toxin, or something else entirely...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Neurological conditions Parenting Source Type: blogs
A rare, polio-like illness continues to spread across the United States, puzzling and concerning health officials who are investigating the mysterious condition. So far this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has reported a total of 72 confirmed cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) in 24 states, including clusters in Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Colorado. Ninety percent of confirmed diagnoses were in children younger than 18, according to the CDC. The agency is investigating another 119 patients in connection with the disease, which causes symptoms including sudden arm and leg weakness, loss of musc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news
A viral illness outbreak has killed seven children and infected 11 others at a medical facility in New Jersey, state health officials announced Wednesday. The New Jersey Department of Health initially announced that 18 cases of adenovirus, six of them fatal, had been confirmed among pediatric residents at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell. On Wednesday, officials announced that a seventh child, who was among the 18 original confirmed cases, died on Tuesday. An investigation is ongoing, but the center has agreed not to admit new patients until the outbreak is deemed over. New Jersey Governor Phil...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime New Jersey onetime Source Type: news
A viral illness outbreak has killed six children and infected 12 others at a medical facility in New Jersey, state health officials confirmed Tuesday. Eighteen cases of adenovirus, six of them fatal, have been confirmed among pediatric residents at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, according to a statement from the New Jersey Department of Health. An investigation is ongoing, but the center has agreed not to admit new patients until the outbreak is deemed over. New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy said in a statement Tuesday that state and local health officials are working to contain the outbreak. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime New Jersey onetime Source Type: news
  NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday reported a jump in cases of a rare paralyzing illness in children, and said it seems to be following an every-other-year pattern. At least 62 cases have been confirmed in 22 states this year, and at least 65 additional illnesses in those states are being investigated, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Similar waves of the same illness occurred in 2014 and 2016. CDC officials say they haven't found the cause. Some possible suspects, such as polio and West Nile virus, have been ruled out. Another kind of virus is suspected, but i...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has so far this year recorded 127 suspected cases of a polio-like nervous system disorder that can cause paralysis, fueling an ongoing investigation into an outbreak of the rare disease. Of those 127 illnesses, 62 cases in 22 states are confirmed to be acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), the CDC said Tuesday. The CDC recorded only 33 confirmed cases of the severe condition — which typically affects kids and can result in muscle weakness or paralysis, respiratory failure and even death — during all of last year, though there were 149 cases the year before. “W...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Minnesota onetime Source Type: news
Six Minnesota children have recently been diagnosed with a rare, polio-like nervous system disorder that can cause paralysis — and the cluster is concerning and puzzling state health officials. The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) has since mid-September received a half-dozen reports of children with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a severe condition that typically affects kids and can result in muscle weakness or paralysis, respiratory failure and even death, according to a statement. All of the Minnesota patients are younger than 10, and cases have been reported in northeastern and central parts of the state, as ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Minnesota onetime Source Type: news
Three more children have come down with a polio-like nervous system disorder that can cause paralysis, fueling an ongoing investigation into an outbreak of the rare disease. Three children are being treated for suspected cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) at UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, ABC News reports. The new patients join a cluster of cases in Minnesota and another in Colorado. As of September 30, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had this year recorded 38 confirmed cases of the severe condition, which typically affects kids and can result in muscle weakness or paralysis, respirat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Minnesota onetime Source Type: news
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