Scientists find how deadly malaria parasite jumped from gorillas to humans

Scientists who resurrected a 50,000-year-old gene sequence have analyzed it to figure out how the world's deadliest malaria parasite jumped from gorillas to humans - giving insight into the origins of one of human history's biggest killers.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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ConclusionThese results indicate that A. farnesiana pods contain nematocidal compounds and might be promising natural anthelmintic agents against H. contortus. This leguminous plant could be used as a nutraceutical food source for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in small ruminants.Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
by Awtum M. Brashear, Wanlapa Roobsoong, Faiza A. Siddiqui, Wang Nguitragool, Jetsumon Sattabongkot, Margarita M. L ópez-Uribe, Jun Miao, Liwang CuiPlasmodium ovale accounts for a disproportionate number of travel-related malaria cases. This parasite is understudied since there is a reliance on clinical samples. We collected aP.ovale curtisi parasite isolate from a clinical case in western Thailand and performed RNA-seq analysis on the blood stage transcriptomes. Using bothde novo assembly and alignment-based methods, we detected the transcripts for 6628 out of 7280 annotated genes. For those lacking evidence of exp...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
(University of Bern) An international scientific consortium led by the cell biologists Volker Heussler from the University of Bern and Oliver Billker from the Ume å University in Sweden has for the first time systematically investigated the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium throughout its life cycle in a large-scale experiment. The researchers were able to identify hundreds of targets that are urgently needed in drug and vaccine development to eradicate the disease.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Malaria vector control and research rely heavily on monitoring mosquito populations for the development of resistance to public health insecticides. One standard method for determining resistance in adult mosq...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial properties against malaria parasite in 15 plants mentioned in Indian traditional medicine texts.MethodsIn vitro antiplasmodial activity of methanolic extracts obtained from Indian traditional medicinal plants was evaluated on Plasmodium falciparum of FCK2 and INDO strains using schizont maturation inhibition assay and parasite lactate dehydrogenase inhibition assay.ResultsMethanolic extracts of Adhatoda zeylanica, Embelia ribes, Piper nigrum and Plumbago zeylanica exhibited more than 50% inhibition in both the stains in schizont maturation inhibition a...
Source: Journal of Integrative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Parasites genes prepare it for the unexpected, but could be exploited to fight the disease More at https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=299535&WT.mc_id=USNSF_1 This is a Research News item.
Source: NSF Discoveries - Category: Science Source Type: research
Malaria, one of the largest health burdens worldwide, is caused by Plasmodium spp. infection. Upon infection, the host ’s immune system begins to clear the parasites. However, Plasmodium species have evolved to es...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
This study describes the genetic diversity and population structure from September 2012 to March 2015 in three geographically distant settlements, Cahuide (CAH), Lupuna (LUP) and Santa Emilia (STE), located in the Peruvian Amazon. A total 777P.vivax mono-infections, out of 3264, were genotyped. Among study areas, LUP showed 19.7% of polyclonal infections, and its genetic diversity (Hexp) was 0.544. Temporal analysis showed a significant increment of polyclonal infections andHexp, and the introduction and persistence of a new parasite population since March 2013. In STE, 40.1% of infections were polyclonal, withHexp = 0.596...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Parasites genes prepare it for the unexpected, but could be exploited to fight the disease More at https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=299535&WT.mc_id=USNSF_1 This is a Research News item.
Source: NSF Discoveries - Category: Science Source Type: research
Abstract Malaria is a disease of public health importance in many parts of the world. Currently, there is no effective way to eradicate malaria, so developing safe, efficient, and cost-effective vaccines against this disease remains an important goal. Current research on malaria vaccines is focused on developing vaccines against pre-erythrocytic stage parasites and blood-stage parasites or on developing a transmission-blocking vaccine. Here, we briefly describe the progress made towards a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the most pathogenic of the malaria parasite species to infect humans. PMID: 3168740...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
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