Kidney transplantation after sleeve gastrectomy in the morbidly obese candidate: results of a 2-year experience

Morbid obesity serves as a barrier to kidney transplantation (KT) due to potential suboptimal posttransplant outcomes. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has previously been shown to improve transplant eligibility through weight loss.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Related Links:

Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy may help improve kidney transplant candidacy among morbidly obese patients, but important questions remain.American Journal of Transplantation
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Transplantation Journal Article Source Type: news
Morbid obesity serves as a barrier to kidney transplantation (KT) due to potential suboptimal post-transplant outcomes. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has previously been shown to improve transplant eligibility through weight loss.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
Obesity is now common among children and adults who are kidney transplant candidates and recipients. It is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney failure. This also pertains to potential living kidney donors with obesity. Obese patients with end-stage renal disease benefit from transplantation as do nonobese patients, but obesity is also associated with more risk. A complicating factor is that obesity is also associated with increased survival on maintenance dialysis in adults, but not in children. The assessment of obesity and body habitus should be individualized. Body mass index is a comm...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
ConclusionsAlthough bariatric surgery in the transplant population is not yet extensively studied and is mostly reported in small series, it seems a useful approach for the treatment of morbid obesity in these high-risk patients. Comparative data regarding optimal timing and type of bariatric procedure and long-term results are warranted.
Source: Current Transplantation Reports - Category: Transplant Surgery Source Type: research
Morbid obesity has been shown to increase risk of perioperative complications, delayed graft function, and mortality in kidney, liver, and lung/heart transplants. Both laparoscopic gastric bypass(LGBP) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy(LSG) have been proven to be safe and efficacious in patients with end-stage kidney and liver disease of various etiologies, and are utilized to improve transplant candidacy by treating morbid obesity and associated co-morbidities, however the optimal bariatric operation for each transplant is not clear.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Morbid obesity is a barrier to kidney transplantation due to inferior outcomes, including higher rates of new‐onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT), delayed graft function (DGF), and graft failure. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) increases transplant eligibility by reducing BMI in kidney transplant candidates, but the effect of surgical weight loss on posttransplantation outcomes is unknown. Reviewing single‐center medical records, we identified all patients who underwent LSG before kidney transplantation from 2011‐2016 (n = 20). Post‐LSG kidney recipients were compared with similar‐BMI rec...
Source: American Journal of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Abstract Morbid obesity is a barrier to KT due to inferior outcomes, including higher rates of new‐onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT), delayed graft function (DGF), and graft failure. LSG increases transplant eligibility by reducing body mass index (BMI) in KT candidates, but the effect of surgical weight loss on post‐transplant outcomes is unknown. Reviewing single‐center medical records, we identified all patients who underwent LSG prior to KT from 2011‐2016 (n=20). Post‐LSG kidney recipients were compared with similar‐BMI recipients who did not undergo LSG, using 2:1 direct matching for patient fac...
Source: American Journal of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsSG is technically feasible after LT and resulted in weight loss without adversely affecting graft function and immunosuppression. However, morbidity and mortality are high.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
ConclusionsAccording to the results of this small sample series, LSG seems to be an effective and safe procedure in DDRF patients with concomitant obesity and can increase access to transplantation.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Regarding the Article: “Successful Management of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity With the Use of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy After Kidney Transplantation—A Case Report”
Source: Transplantation Proceedings - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Erratum Source Type: research
More News: Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Gastrectomy | Gastroenterology | Kidney Transplant | Kidney Transplantation | Laparoscopy | Obesity | Surgery | Transplant Surgery | Transplants | Urology & Nephrology | Weight Loss