5 Lessons in Expressing Your Feelings

“If the only thing people learned was not to be afraid of their experience, that alone would change the world.” – Sidney Banks I spent most of my life scared of my feelings. Having feelings and expressing them made me mentally ill—or so I was led to believe by a large number of mental health professionals. When I felt sad, they labeled me as depressed. When I showed any signs of anxiety, they gave me another list of mental health disorders I needed medication for. And if I was angry? Oh well, that was the absolute worst. That clearly proved how insane and utterly out of control I was! I didn’t understand how they couldn’t see what was really going on for me. I couldn’t understand how everyone saw me as the problem when what was happening to me was the actual problem. But that’s a story for another time. I was brought up to be a good girl, which meant that any angry expressions were forbidden, shamed, and punished. I wasn’t allowed to express disappointment because that made me ungrateful. I couldn’t ask for what I wanted because that made me greedy. I wasn’t allowed to disagree with anyone because that made me difficult. I couldn’t express frustration because that meant I was out of control and needed to be left alone to think about my shameful behavior. I didn’t ask for help because good girls don’t inconvenience other people. I couldn’t be happy either because that made me attention-s...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Personal Publishers Tiny Buddha Emotional Expression Emotions expressing feelings Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion: Major limitations of the reviewed studies were short trial duration, small sample sizes, and the lack of control groups. Defining the potential role of DUL in the treatment of psychiatric disorders other than major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder needs further randomized, placebo-controlled studies.
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Prescription of antidepressants is common among older adults, not just in the treatment of depression but also anxiety, panic disorder, neuropathic pain and urinary incontinence.1 Based on a Eurobarometer survey carried out in 27 European countries, 9.5% of adults aged 55 and over reported antidepressant use in the past year2 while Mars et al3 showed that antidepressant prescribing in the UK increased between 1995 and 2011, particularly in adults aged 46 and over. In older adults, antidepressant use has been associated with an increased likelihood of adverse outcomes such as cardiovascular events, hyponatremia, falls and f...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research
Are you always in control and always perfectly put together? Are you professionally successful, a great friend, and always showing a happy face to the world?  But what about on the inside? Is there something in the background or in the past that you don’t talk about?  Do you feel disconnected, like no one knows the “real” you? Deep down do you just know something is wrong? Well, you might have “perfectly hidden depression.” Today Gabe speaks with Dr. Margaret Rutherford who has done extensive work on the relationship between perfectionism and depression.  Dr. Rutherford tells u...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Happiness Interview LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Perfectionism Personality Podcast Psychiatry Psychology Research Self-Esteem Self-Help The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs
Although both multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are demyelinating diseases, their psychiatric disturbances may differ given differences in the neurological manifestations. We used subjective and objective measurements to compare the psychiatric disturbances in patients with MS and NMO. Psychiatric disturbances were assessed in 24 MS and 35 NMO patients using the Beck Hopelessness Scale, Symptom Checklist-95 and the brief version of World Health Organization Quality of Life. Personality was assessed using the Big Five Inventory-10. Disease-related function was assessed using the Fatigue Severity Scale,...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research
   Today we are joined by Dr. Russell Morfitt, co-founder of LearntoLive.com.  Dr. Morfitt explains the differences between stress, worry, anxiety, social anxiety, and panic, and tell us how using the techniques of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) can be life changing.  The Learn to Live program is designed to teach CBT skills online to anxiety sufferers, those who suffer from depression, and even insomniacs!  Listen in to learn how you can begin to free yourself from the burdens of anxiety.  SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Anxiety, Stress, and Worry’ Podcas...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: People with moderate-severe TBI experience other medical and mental health comorbidities during the long-term course of recovery and life after injury. The findings can inform further investigation into comorbidities associated with TBI and the role of medical care, surveillance, prevention, lifestyle, and healthy behaviors in potentially modifying their presence and/or prevalence over the life span.
Source: The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
You're reading 5 Surprising Things Stress Can Do to Your Body, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You just got off a terrible meeting, your boss gave you an impossible deadline for the next project, your team is pushing you to make extra hours, and you still need to pick up the kids at school. Your body is in a “fight or flight response.” Your stress levels are high, you feel your breath get quicker and even feel your heart beating faster than usual. Although this is all a natural response from y...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness self improvement stress Source Type: blogs
This week’s Psychology Around the Net covers ways you can be “good” at therapy (no joke), highlights an 11-year-old Montreal boy who created a video game to help kids understand mental health, how focusing on a few key habits can help keep you grounded when life gets hectic, recognizing postpartum depression in fathers, and more. Get to learning! Therapists Share 7 Ways You Can Be “Good” at Getting Therapy: No, this definitely is not about winning at therapy. You won’t find tips on how to make your therapist like you or trick your therapist into thinking you’re not as sad as you ac...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Psychology Around the Net anxiety esketamine goals habits Happiness Luke Toledo men and postpartum depression panic Spravato Therapy Video Games workplace Source Type: blogs
I was looking back over the last 8 years since the first Wheat Belly book was released. It’s been 8 years of astounding, truly breathtaking stories of success over weight issues, health, and physical transformations that skeptics even today claim are impossible. It’s been a virtual avalanche of wonderful stories. Although I’ve seen all of them, often more than once, I could not help but be overcome with satisfaction and pride for the many, many spectacular photos and stories people have shared. So I thought it would be fun to re-post a small sample of some of these stories dating back from the start of th...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories grain-free Inflammation Source Type: blogs
Yafei Tan1,2, Omer Van den Bergh2, Jiang Qiu1* and Andreas von Leupoldt2* 1Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China 2Health Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Dyspnea is a prevalent interoceptive sensation and the aversive cardinal symptom in many cardiorespiratory diseases as well as in mental disorders. Especially the unpredictability of the occurrence of dyspnea episodes has been suggested to be highly anxiety provoking for affected patients. Moreover, previous studies demonstrated that unpredictable exteroceptive stimuli increased self-reports and electrophysiological responses of an...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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