Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with advanced fibrosis and stroke

There is an increasing appreciation of the cardiovascular implications of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with advanced fibrosis (NAFLD-fibrosis). However, data regarding stroke risk are limited. We sought to investigate whether NAFLD-fibrosis is associated with stroke in addition to heart disease.
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research

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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
ConclusionUltrasonographically acquired HRI has a significant predictive impact on the detection of prediabetes and diabetes in patients with NAFLD.
Source: Indian Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
This study explored the proportion of NAFLD cases and increased liver fibrosis (LF), and the association between LF and either chronic kidney disease (CKD) or cardiovascular complications in T2DM patients. METHODS: - The study included 137 patients with non-insulin-treated T2DM and no known liver disease consecutively attending our diabetes outpatients service who underwent liver ultrasonography and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) using vibration-controlled transient elastography (FibroScan®). RESULTS: - The proportion of patients with hepatic steatosis on ultrasonography was 73.7%, and the proportion with ...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Diabetes Metab Source Type: research
Parikh et al. conducted a cross-sectional study on the relationship of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with advanced fibrosis (NAFLD-fibrosis) with stroke, heart disease, and major cardiovascular disease [1]. As indicators of NAFLD-fibrosis, the Fibrosis-4 Score (FIB-4) and NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) were used for the analysis. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of the FIB-4 for stroke was 1.87 (1.00 –3.50). In addition, adjusted ORs of NAFLD-fibrosis for heart disease and major cardiovascular disease significantly increased.
Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
(CNN) — Whether you eat breakfast might be linked with your risk of dying early from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related death, especially stroke-related death, in the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology on Monday. After a person’s age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, diet, lifestyle, body mass index and disease status were taken into account, the study found that those who never had breakfast had a 87% higher risk of cardiovascular mortality compared with people who h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news
Increasing Upstream Chromatin Long–Range Interactions May Favor Induction of Circular RNAs in LysoPC-Activated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Angus Li1,2†, Yu Sun1†, Charles Drummer IV1, Yifan Lu1, Daohai Yu3, Yan Zhou4, Xinyuan Li1, Simone J. Pearson1, Candice Johnson1, Catherine Yu5, William Y. Yang1, Kevin Mastascusa1, Xiaohua Jiang1, Jianxin Sun6, Thomas Rogers7, Wenhui Hu1, Hong Wang1 and Xiaofeng Yang1,7* 1Center for Metabolic Disease Research, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study shows that a higher burden of liver steatosis seems to be associated with less severe stroke and better functional outcome after ischemic stroke or TIA. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a spectrum of diseases from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis with varying degree of fibrosis, and liver cirrhosis (1, 2). NAFLD is becoming the most common chronic liver disease worldwide including Korea, affecting approximately 25% of the general population (3, 4). NAFLD is closely associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and is even recognized as ...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION:: Serum levels of LDL was a protective factor. NAFLD did not increase the unfavorable outcome of ICH patients in our study. PMID: 30922067 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cell Transplantation - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Transplant Source Type: research
No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Baby Boomer Health heart health Source Type: news
More News: Brain | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Fatty Liver Disease (FLD) | Heart | Heart Disease | Liver | Liver Disease | Neurology | Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Diseases (NAFLD) | Stroke | Urology & Nephrology