The mediating effect of psychological factors on the relationship between pain intensity and wrist joint function: a longitudinal study with mediation analysis.

Conclusions: The relationship between pain intensity and wrist function was mediated by anxiety and self-efficacy. Our findings suggest that interventions focused on psychological factors, particularly anxiety and self-efficacy, may be important in distal radius fractures rehabilitation. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION In patients with distal radius fractures, early post-operative pain mediates psychological factors and affects wrist function. Anxiety and self-efficacy are psychological factors that should be noted, and rehabilitation, including self-management, should be considered. Rehabilitative interventions for distal radius fractures should focus on psychological factors and management of post-operative pain. PMID: 31599170 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research

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Once you begin to dip your toes into psychological therapies, it doesn’t take long before you begin to see TLAs all over the place. So today I’m going to post on two things: some of the TLAs, and why or how we might consider using these approaches in pain rehabilitation. The first one is CBT, or cognitive behavioural therapy. CBT grew out of two movements: behaviour therapy (Skinner and the pigeons, rats and all that behaviour modification stuff), and cognitive therapy (Ellis and Beck and the “cognitive triad” – more on this later). When the two approaches to therapy are combined, we have c...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Clinical reasoning Cognitive behavioral therapy Coping strategies Interdisciplinary teams Occupational therapy Physiotherapy Professional topics Psychology Research Science in practice Source Type: blogs
Tobacco smoking is associated with adverse health effects, and its relationship to pain is complex. The longitudinal effect of smoking on patients attending a tertiary pain management center is not well established. Using the Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry of patients attending the Stanford Pain Management Center from 2013 to 2017, we conducted a propensity-weighted analysis to determine independent effects of smoking on patients with chronic pain. We adjusted for covariates including age, sex, body mass index, depression and anxiety history, ethnicity, alcohol use, marital status, disability, and educa...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Migraine is a frequently disabling neurologic condition which can be complicated by medication overuse headache and comorbid medical disorders, including obesity, anxiety and depression. Although most migraine management takes place in outpatient clinics, inpatient treatment is indicated for migraine refractory to multiple outpatient treatments, with intractable nausea or vomiting, need for detoxification from medication overuse (such as opioids and barbiturates), and significant medical and psychiatric disease. The goals of inpatient treatment include breaking the current cycle of headache pain, reducing the frequency and...
Source: Neurologic Clinics - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Michaelides A, Zis P Abstract Pain is a subjective experience that is influenced by genetics, gender, social, cultural and personal parameters. Opposed to chronic pain, which by definition has to last for at least 3 months, acute pain is mostly because of trauma, acute medical conditions or treatment. The link between mood disorders and acute pain has proven to be increasingly significant since the link is bi-directional, and both act as risk factors for each other. Depression and anxiety are associated with increased perception of pain severity, whereas prolonged duration of acute pain leads to increased ...
Source: Postgraduate Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Postgrad Med Source Type: research
Today’s post is another one where there’s very little to guide my thinking… Have you ever wondered why we read so much research looking at the characteristics of the people who look for help with their pain – yet not nearly as much about us, the people who do the helping? There are studies about us – thanks Ben – and others! (Darlow, Dowell, Baxter, Mathieson, Perr &Dean, 2013; Farin, Gramm &Schmidt, 2013; Parsons, Harding, Breen, Foster, Pincus, Vogel &Underwood, 2007). We know some things are helpful for people with pain: things like listening capabilities (Matthias, Ba...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Research Science in practice attitudes beliefs communication nocebo Source Type: blogs
The last 30 years or more of pain research and management have been exciting for us pain nerds. We’ve learned so much about processes involved in nociception, about the psychology of our responses to nociceptive input, about treatments (that often don’t work terribly well), and we’ve discovered that we (mainly) don’t know what we don’t know. There are some big questions though, that have yet to be answered – and don’t yet share the limelight that neurobiological processes seem to hog. Here are a few of my big questions. How do we alter public health policy to move from an acute ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Motivation Pain conditions Professional topics Science in practice questions Source Type: blogs
Authors: Bayoumi AB, Ikizgul O, Karaali CN, Bozkurt S, Konya D, Toktas ZO Abstract Antidepressant drugs can be advantageous in treating psychiatric and non-psychiatric illnesses, including spinal disorders. However, spine surgeons remain unfamiliar with the advantages and disadvantages of the use of antidepressant drugs as a part of the medical management of diseases of the spine. Our review article describes a systematic method using the PubMed/Medline database with a specific set of keywords to identify such benefits and drawbacks based on 17 original relevant articles published between January 2000 and February ...
Source: Asian Spine Journal - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Asian Spine J Source Type: research
Conclusions: Monitoring the affective dimension of pain should be included in an integrated approach to pain, and Hatha yoga may be beneficial in the pain management of FM participants. PMID: 31370034 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Advances in Mind Body Medicine - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Adv Mind Body Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Depression, disability and sleep disturbance appear to be the main factors explaining fatigue in patients with RA. Disease activity, pain, and personality seem to play only a secondary role, extroversion being the only personality trait associated with fatigue. These findings foster a shift in the paradigm of care towards a more holistic management of fatigue, integrating adjunctive therapies beyond measures targeted solely at disease remission. PMID: 31365331 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Tags: Clin Exp Rheumatol Source Type: research
Conclusion. Our study identifies the various factors associated with a lower likelihood of RTW at 3 months after cervical spine surgery in the non-worker's compensation setting. This information provides expectations for the patient and employer when undergoing cervical spine surgery. Level of Evidence: 3
Source: Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: CERVICAL SPINE Source Type: research
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