Hearing aids may help delay dementia, depression in elders

For older adults, hearing aids may delay some forms of mental and physical decline associated with hearing loss and aging, a U.S. study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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A recent study concludes that wearing hearing aids is associated with later onset of dementia and a reduced risk of anxiety, depression, and falls.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news
Manufacturers are stepping up efforts to integrate hearing assistive technology with smart phones and Bluetooth technology, according to a recent article from NextAvenue—a PBS media outlet for older adults. The article describes apps that work directly with hearing aids from Audibel, NuEar, Oticon, Phonak, Starkey, and others. The apps allow users to stream sound directly to their hearing aids, translate calls into text, and sync with smart home systems. Others automatically turn off the lights when you turn off your hearing aid at night, alert you when someone rings the doorbell, or use your phone as a microphone to...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care News Private Practice Schools Slider Hearing Assistive Technology hearing loss Source Type: blogs
Hearing aids are a bigger deal than you thought. A new study links their use in older people with hearing loss to a lower risk of dementia, depression and fall-related injuries over three years, compared with those who didn't wear hearing aids. New products coming next year may help affordability.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between hearing aids (HAs) and time to diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) or dementia, anxiety or depression, and injurious falls among adults, aged 66 years and older, within 3 years of hearing loss (HL) diagnosis. ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 -- Use of hearing aids is associated with lower risks for being diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, dementia, depression, anxiety, and injurious falls among elderly adults diagnosed with hearing loss, according to a study...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
Older adults who use hearing aids may be less likely to develop depression, anxiety, and dementia for at least three years after a hearing loss diagnosis compared with those who do not begin using hearing aids, according to astudy published Wednesday in theJournal of the American Geriatrics Society. In addition, these individuals appear less likely to get injured in a fall.“By providing enhanced hearing input, HAs [hearing aids] may facilitate greater social engagement, lower levels of effort to recognize sounds and speech, lower levels of depression or anxiety symptoms, higher levels of physical balance, and greater...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Alzheimer's anxiety dementia depression fall injury geriatric psychiatry health insurance hearing aid hearing loss Medicare Source Type: research
After getting their first hearing aid, older adults have a lower likelihood of anxiety, depression and dementia compared to those who don't, a new study says.
Source: Health News - UPI.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusion: Infection with HIV in rural older South Africans is a prevalent problem, and together with older age, is a significant contributor to cognitive impairment. It is possible that HIV infection contributes to dementia on the basis of an acceleration of degeneration – because our HIV-infected participants were younger – AND an accentuation of aging – because of the higher rates of impairment for similar age groups.
Source: AIDS - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND SOCIAL Source Type: research
Frequent use of sleep medications appears to be associated with increased long-term risk of dementia, particularly among older white adults, according to research presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Los Angeles this week.“Based on our findings, we recommend that clinicians make more effort to be aware of their patients’ sleep problems including use of sleep aids,” said lead study author Yue Leng, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, in apress release.Leng and colleagues studied 3,068 black and white community-dwelling older adults aged 70 to 79 years who ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Association International Conference dementia Los Angeles older white adults sleep medications Source Type: research
Conclusion
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
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