WHO anti-cholera vaccination campaign begins in Sudan

World Health Organization launches vaccination campaign in Sudan's southeastern provinces to contain cholera outbreak
Source: ABC News: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Stakeholders should tailor the design, content, and implementation of future cholera prevention and control methods to meet the needs of the community. Future educational camping should focus on transmission prevention, including vaccination. Education and sustainable interventions should be implemented to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene.
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Hygiene - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Ng QX, De Deyn MLZQ, Loke W, Yeo WS Abstract Yemen has been faced with the worst cholera epidemic of modern times, with more than 1 million suspected cases and 3000 deaths at the time of writing. This problem is largely due to the longstanding civil war between pro-government forces and the Houthi armed movement, which has severely damaged already vulnerable sanitation and healthcare facilities and systems in the country. It is further compounded by a dire lack of basic amenities, chronic malnutrition, and unfavourable weather conditions. Another contributory component may be aerial transfer by cholera-inf...
Source: Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: J Prev Med Public Health Source Type: research
August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM) and this year vaccines and immunology are probably on many more people’s minds than usual – for obvious reasons. While medical professionals and researchers work tirelessly on developing and testing a COVID-19 vaccine (amongst others), let’s briefly remind ourselves how far we have come in such a brief segment of human history. 224 years, 40 vaccines The first vaccine, developed in 1796 for smallpox, was not put into mass production until many years later – but was a monumental breakthrough in Medicine. It took almost another 100 years before th...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: News Source Type: blogs
Countries around the world have introduced stringent control measures to stop COVID-19 outbreaks growing, but now many find themselves facing the same situation again. From Melbourne to Miami, the relaxation of measures had led to increasing flare-ups, which in some places has already meant reclosing schools, businesses or travel routes. Within the U.S. and among different countries, places with wildly varying public-health policies have experienced wildly diverse outcomes. Most ominously, infections are rising rapidly in many places where they once were falling. So how do countries avoid an indefinite, unsustainable, cycl...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
by Alexandra Smirnova, Natalie Sterrett, Oscar J. Mujica, C ésar Munayco, Luis Suárez, Cécile Viboud, Gerardo Chowell After being cholera free for over 100 years, Peru experienced an unprecedented epidemic ofVibrio cholerae O1 that began in 1991 and generated multiple waves of disease over several years. We developed a mechanistic transmission model that accounts for seasonal variation in temperature to estimate spatial variability in the basic reproduction number (R0), the initial concentration of vibrios in the environment, and cholera reporting rates. From 1991-1997, cholera spread following a mult...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Devyn Holliday, Research Officer, Economic, Youth &Sustainable Development Directorate   This blog is part of the seminar series on ‘The Economics of COVID-19’.By Devyn HollidayJun 10 2020 (IPS-Partners) When countries shuttered their shops, closed their markets, and cordoned off places of gathering to help ward off the coronavirus, they did so out of immediate concern for the health and wellbeing of their citizens. However, as these measures endure the virus is no longer the sole threat to the health and wellbeing of citizens. People across the globe are facing mounting threats to their wellbeing c...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Economy & Trade Health Labour Source Type: news
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Laura MackenzieMay 6 2020 (IPS) Interruptions to vaccination programmes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could result in new waves of measles or polio outbreaks, health experts warn. A growing number of one-off immunisation campaigns and national routine vaccine introductions are being delayed amid social distancing and other measures to curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2, leaving millions unprotected. With both preventive campaigns and routine immunisations impacted, “we’ll have an increasing number of children who will becom...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
A 2018 cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe underscored the importance of community-wide water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions, as well as vaccination and outbreak detection in reducing cholera's impact.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Cholera (Vibrio cholerae) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Outbreaks Source Type: news
by John Mwaba, Amanda K. Debes, Patrick Shea, Victor Mukonka, Orbrie Chewe, Caroline Chisenga, Michelo Simuyandi, Geoffrey Kwenda, David Sack, Roma Chilengi, Mohammad Ali The global burden of cholera is increasing, with the majority (60%) of the cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In Zambia, widespread cholera outbreaks have occurred since 1977, predominantly in the capital city of Lusaka. During both the 2016 and 2018 outbreaks, the Ministry of Health implement ed cholera vaccination in addition to other preventative and control measures, to stop the spread and control the outbreak. Given the limitations in vaccine av...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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