Antibiogram, virulotyping and genetic diversity of Escherichia coli and Salmonella serovars isolated from diarrheic calves and calf handlers

Publication date: Available online 10 October 2019Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Rasha M.A. Gharieb, Elshaima M. Fawzi, Ibrahim ElsohabyAbstractAntimicrobial resistance profile of E. coli and Salmonella serovars isolated from diarrheic calves and handlers in Egypt is unknown due to the absence of monitoring. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the virulence, genetic and antimicrobial resistance profiles of E. coli and Salmonella serovars associated with diarrhea in calves and handlers in intensive dairy farms in Egypt. A total of 36 bacterial strains (20 E. coli and 16 Salmonella) were isolated from fecal samples of 80 diarrheic Holstein dairy calves (10 E. coli and 13 Salmonella) and hand swabs of 35 handlers (10 E. coli and 3 Salmonella) in two intensive dairy farms in Sharkia Governate in Egypt. E. coli strains belonged to six different serogroups and O114:K90 was the most prevalent serogroup (30%). However, Salmonella strains were serotyped into four different serogroups and S. Kiel was the most prevalent serotype (50%). Thirteen (65%) E. coli isolates were harbouring either stx2, eaeA and/or astA virulence-associated genes. However, stn and spvC virulence genes were detected in 2 (12.5%) and 4 (25%) of Salmonella isolates, respectively. E. coli isolates showed marked resistance to ampicillin (75%), while Salmonella strains exhibited high resistance to amikacin (100%), gentamicin (93.75%) and tobramycin (87.5%). Results...
Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research

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Abstract Background: The 21st century has seen a wide range of diseases resulting from zoonotic infections, of which bacterial infections have led to outbreaks of food-borne diseases. Aim: The study looks at bacterial pathogen carriage by farm rats and their antimicrobial susceptibility, with the view of providing insights for antimicrobial surveillance. Method: Farm rats of Rattus rattus species where randomly collected alive from farms in Al-Ahsa using food baits. They were anaesthetize with urethane within 4 h of collection and were unconscious for the collection of samples. Basic bacteriologic...
Source: Environmental Health Insights - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Environ Health Insights Source Type: research
Once a dangerous new pathogen is out, as we are seeing, it can be difficult if not impossible to prevent it going global. One as contagious as SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to infect the whole of humanity. Eighty per cent of cases may be benign, but with such a large pool of susceptible hosts, the numbers who experience severe illness and die can still be shockingly high. So the only sensible answer to the question, how do we stop this from happening again, is: by doing all we can to prevent such pathogens infecting humans in the first place. And that means taking a long, hard look at our relationship with the natural world...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
ConclusionsWhen fed at approved dosages for typical durations, tylosin increases the proportion of macrolide-resistant enterococci in the cattle gastrointestinal tract, which could pose a zoonotic risk to human beef consumers. Feeding tylosin for short durations may mitigate the impact on macrolide-resistant enterococci and further studies are encouraged to determine the effect of minimizing or eliminating tylosin use in beef cattle. There may also be an impact on other bacteria and other antimicrobial resistances but additional details or data are needed to strengthen these comparisons. We encourage authors of antimicrobi...
Source: Preventive Veterinary Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Abstract Wild birds have been the focus of a great deal of research investigating the epidemiology of zoonotic bacteria and antimicrobial resistance in the environment. While enteric pathogens (e.g. Campylobacter, Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7) and antimicrobial resistant bacteria of public health importance have been isolated from a wide variety of wild bird species, there is a considerable variation in the measured prevalence of a given microorganism from different studies. This variation may often reflect differences in certain ecological and biological factors such as feeding habits and immune status. Variat...
Source: Animal Health Research Reviews - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Anim Health Res Rev Source Type: research
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 1/31/2020. Salmonella and campylobacter are becoming increasingly resistant to ciprofloxacin, one of the antibiotics of choice for treating infections caused by these bacteria. That conclusion is part of this 166-page report on antimicrobial resistance in zoonoses, released with the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which also presents some positive trends in the animal sector and includes key outcome indicators that will help European Union Member States assess their progress in reducing the use of antimicrobials and combat...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Abstract Antimicrobial resistance profile of E. coli and Salmonella serovars isolated from diarrheic calves and handlers in Egypt is unknown due to the absence of monitoring. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the virulence, genetic and antimicrobial resistance profiles of E. coli and Salmonella serovars associated with diarrhea in calves and handlers in intensive dairy farms in Egypt. A total of 36 bacterial strains (20 E. coli and 16 Salmonella) were isolated from fecal samples of 80 diarrheic Holstein dairy calves (10 E. coli and 13 Salmonella) and hand swabs of 35 handlers (10 E. coli and 3 Salmonella) i...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
syl D Abstract Turtoises are a great puzzle when it comes to their bacterial flora, the composition and structure of which are still unknown in details. Its component which has been best described so far is Salmonella spp., presumably due to the threat of reptile-associated salmonellosis in humans. This investigation tried to assess and characterize intestinal bacterial flora of imported tortoises found dead during quarantine. Most of the animals carried various serovars of Salmonella showing no antimicrobial resistance. Presence of multiresistant Escherichia coli was possibly a result of industrial breeding and h...
Source: Comparative immunology, microbiology and infectious diseases. - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis Source Type: research
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 5/28/2019. This 25-page report presents the results of the third round of the external quality assessment on antimicrobial susceptibility testing for national public health laboratories for Campylobacter (Campylobacter EQA3-AST) within the Food- and Waterborne Diseases and Zoonoses Network (FWD-Net). It is part of a European Union protocol for harmonized monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in human Salmonella and Campylobacter isolates. Campylobacteriosis, followed by salmonellosis, is the leading cause of zoonotic foodborne d...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 10 May 2019Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Olga Goławska, Magdalena Zając, Aleksandra Maluta, Peter Pristas, Ľudmila Hamarová, Dariusz WasylAbstractTurtles are a great puzzle when it comes to bacterial flora, the composition and structure of which are still unknown in details. Its component which has been best described so far is Salmonella spp., presumably due to the threat of Reptile Associated Salmonellosis in humans. This investigation tried to assess and characterize intestinal bacterial flora of imported tortoises found dead d...
Source: Comparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Conclusion This study confirms the in vitro antibacterial activity of BIOCITRO® against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. For most of the strains, the product reached the bactericidal effect at the same concentration of the bacteriostatic effect and maximum difference between MIC and MBC was two dilution steps. The less susceptible species of the study were S. enterica ssp. enterica and E. coli with MBC90 values of 256 and 128 μg/mL, respectively, while the most susceptible was C. perfringens with MBC90 of 16 μg/mL. After short exposition time to the product, the significant effect over the viability of ...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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