Taking a pay cut at work could boost your heart disease risks by nearly 20%, study finds

A new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, found that the risk of strokes and heart attacks rose nearly 20 percent for those whose salary decreased.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development report said 62 per cent of adults in the UK are overweight, putting them at risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, strokes and cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Abstract OBJECTIVE: This umbrella review provides an overview of the consistency and gaps in the evidence base on eggs and cardiometabolic health. DESIGN: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, the Nutrition Evidence Systematic Review and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality databases were screened for evidence-based reviews in English that assessed human studies on egg consumption and cardiometabolic outcomes. RESULTS: Seven systematic reviews and fifteen meta-analyses were identified, with eighteen of these published since 2015. Overall, the systematic reviews were of low quality, while meta-a...
Source: Public Health Nutrition - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Public Health Nutr Source Type: research
A new blood filtration technology may prove to be life-saving for patients whose normally healthy inflammatory response to injury or illness has gone into overdrive, resulting in fatally high levels of cytokines in their blood. In an interview with MD+DI, Dr. Phillip Chan, MD, PhD, CEO of CytoSorbents Corp., explained that inflammation, and the production of substances called cytokines that drive inflammation, are the body’s natural response to heal injury or infection. But sometimes, the inflammatory response is so severe in such conditions as sepsis and infection, burn injuries, trauma, pancreatitis, li...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news
Purpose of review In recent years, there have been several cardiovascular outcomes trials (CVOT) of two new classes of glucose-lowering medications: sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2-i) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RA). It is important examine their potential for cardiovascular benefit and possible side effects among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus. Recent findings The current article reviews the findings of recent CVOT of SGLT2-i and GLP-1 RA, including their impact on cardiovascular events and relevant side effects. Summary For all T2D patients, with or wi...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: Edited by Peter H. Stone Source Type: research
In conclusion, AF seems to have a higher prevalence in the general population than previously thought, and is mostly associa ted with hypertension, cardiomyopathy and rheumatic heart disease in SSA. It is associated with a high incidence of heart failure and stroke. The management of AF is suboptimal in SSA, especially with a low uptake of oral anticoagulation.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEWS Source Type: research
I keep hearing radio ads about high-tech cleaners for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines, which are used to treat sleep apnea. Bacteria and mold can accumulate in different parts of the device. Just the touch of a button, say the ads, and all undesirable organisms lurking in the CPAP pump, tube, and mask will be zapped into oblivion. Your CPAP system will be sanitized and ready for use while you sleep. But can a CPAP system really lead to illness? And if so, do we need space-age technology to clean a CPAP machine? Wait: What is a CPAP system and why is one needed? A CPAP machine is one of the best treatmen...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Health Infectious diseases Sleep Source Type: blogs
Black and minority ethnic people less likely than white people to get newer diabetes drugs and be adequately monitored Related items fromOnMedica Should we recognise obesity as a disease? Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised GPs failing to follow women at risk after gestational diabetes Heart disease and stroke deaths plummet in Scotland Diabetes will soon cost NHS £16.9bn
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
This study aimed to investigate the impact of clinical pharmacist intervention on the prognosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Chinese patients with CHD. Two hundred and forty patients who had ACS were recruited. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 120) or the control group (n = 120). The intervention group received a medication assessment and education by the clinical pharmacist at discharge and telephone follow-ups at 1 week and 1 and 3 months after discharge. The control group received usual care. The primary outcomes of this study were the proportion of patients who had major adverse...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Could just 10 foods substantially impact your risk of dying from a cardiometabolic disease (CMD) like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or stroke? Maybe. A study published in JAMA provides some insight into the degree to which 10 specific foods and nutrients affect the risk of dying from CMD. The study found that in 2012, eating suboptimal levels of 10 foods or nutrients — too much of some and not enough of others — was associated with more than 45% of deaths due to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. 10 foods associated with nearly half of CMD deaths The researchers developed a risk assessment model that...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Nutrition Source Type: blogs
Veena S. Kulkarni, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Sociology and Geography, Arkansas State University, USA; and Raghav Gaiha, (Hon.) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, England.By Veena S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaNEW DELHI, India and JONESBORO, US, Oct 7 2019 (IPS) China’s almost meteoric transition from a being a low income to a middle income country within a span of four decades is often perceived as a miracle analogous to the post Second World War Japanese economic development experience. China’s GDP rose from $200 current United States dolla...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Food & Agriculture Food Sustainability Globalisation Headlines Health Labour TerraViva United Nations Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition Foundation (BCFN) Source Type: news
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