Obesity shaves THREE YEARS off the average life expectancy of Britons, report finds

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development report said 62 per cent of adults in the UK are overweight, putting them at risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, strokes and cancer.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

“Lifestyle medicine is only for rich people, right?” a colleague asked me several years ago, questioning my involvement in this relatively new field of medicine that guides people toward healthy habits. This has been a common misperception, for sure. But across the US, a revitalized brand of health activism is intent on bringing lifestyle medicine to a broader range of people. This is backed by a new effort from the American College of Lifestyle Medicine to engage communities most affected by chronic disease. The first pillar of healthy lifestyle: Food is medicine Lifestyle medicine is an evidence-based practic...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Food as medicine Health Health care disparities Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsWe did not find enough reliable evidence to find out whether a tax on the fat content of foods resulted in people eating less fat, or less saturated fat.We did not find any evidence about how a tax on the fat content of foods affected obesity or overweight.The results of our review will change when further evidence becomes available.Discussing the findings of this review, lead author Stefan Lhachimi said, “A tax on saturated fats could be in principle a good approach to reduce the consumption of so-called junk foods, a group of food products which is fiendishly tricky to define in legal terms. By taxing a ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
In conclusion, using a large cohort with rich health and DNA methylation data, we provide the first comparison of six major epigenetic measures of biological ageing with respect to their associations with leading causes of mortality and disease burden. DNAm GrimAge outperformed the other measures in its associations with disease data and associated clinical traits. This may suggest that predicting mortality, rather than age or homeostatic characteristics, may be more informative for common disease prediction. Thus, proteomic-based methods (as utilised by DNAm GrimAge) using large, physiologically diverse protein sets for p...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
The coronavirus pandemic has changed a lot about modern American life: how we work, socialize, and even how we eat. Dining out is a distant memory. But nutritionally, people weren’t exactly thriving in pre-pandemic America. “Before COVID-19 came along, it was increasingly clear that the diet quality and nutritional status of Americans was terrible,” says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More than 40% of U.S. adults are obese. After years of declines, heart disease death rates are on the rise again. So are rates of obesity-linked canc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Combining laser acupuncture and a dietary intervention has good effects on waist:hip ratio, QoL scores, BMI, and appetite scores in obese patients. PMID: 32351664 [PubMed]
Source: Acupuncture in Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Med Acupunct Source Type: research
Are healthy habits worth cultivating? A recent study suggests healthy habits may help people tack on years of life and sidestep serious illnesses, such as diabetes and cancer. After all, if you’re going to gain an extra decade of life on this earth, you want to enjoy it! What did this research focus on? Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at data from more than 73,000 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) who were followed for 34 years, and more than 38,000 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) who were followed for 28 years. In a previous s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Diabetes | Diabetes Type 2 | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Endocrinology | Health | Heart | Heart Disease | Obesity | Stroke