Sleep and neurocognitive decline in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: Alzheimer's &DementiaAuthor(s): Alberto R. Ramos, Wassim Tarraf, Benson Wu, Susan Redline, Jianwen Cai, Martha L. Daviglus, Linda Gallo, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Krista M. Perreira, Phyllis Zee, Donglin Zeng, Hector M. GonzalezAbstractIntroductionTo determine if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration predict seven-year neurocognitive decline in US Hispanics/Latinos (N = 5247).MethodsThe exposures were baseline SDB, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration. The outcomes were change in episodic learning and memory (B-SEVLT-Sum and SEVLT-Recall), language (word fluency [WF]), processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution), and a cognitive impairment screener (Six-item Screener [SIS]).ResultsMean age was 63 ± 8 years, with 55% of the population being female with 7.0% Central American, 24.5% Cuban, 9.3% Dominican, 35.9% Mexican, 14.4% Puerto Rican, and 5.1% South American background. Long sleep (>9 hours), but not short sleep (
Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

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Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD), which accounts for most of the dementia cases, is, aside from cognitive deterioration, often characterized by the presence of non-cognitive symptoms such as activity and sleep disturbances. AD patients typically experience increased sleep fragmentation, excessive daytime sleepiness and night-time insomnia. Here, we sought to investigate the link between sleep architecture, cognition and amyloid pathology in the APP23 amyloidosis mouse model for AD. By means of polysomnographic recordings the sleep-wake cycle of freely-moving APP23 and wild-type (WT) littermates of 3, 6 and 12 mon...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: The use of antidepressants, especially SNRIs, was associated with a shorter survival time of sCJD patients. The possible changes in neurotransmitters should be emphasized. Scientifically, this study may provide insights into the mechanism of CJD. Clinically, it may contribute to the early diagnosis of CJD.IntroductionDepression is common in the elderly. Its prevalence rate is as high as 11.19%, and this increases progressively with worsening cognitive impairment (1). The presence of depression is an acknowledged risk factor for dementia (2); it can even double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (3, 4)...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, sleep, and social activity appear to be associated with cognitive function among older people. Physical activity and appropriate durations of sleep and conversation are important for cognitive function. Introduction Dementia is a major public health issue worldwide, with a serious burden for patients, caregivers, and society, as well as substantial economic impacts (1). Although the prevalence of late-life cognitive impairment and dementia are expected to increase in future, effective disease-modifying treatments are currently unavailable. Therefore, unders...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusions Dysautonomic symptoms frequently occuring in α-synucleinopathies comprise cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital and thermoregulatory disturbances. These symptoms reduce quality of life and worsen prognosis. The understanding of their pathophysiology, as well as the detection of α-synuclein deposition and autonomic dysfunction in the premotor stages of α-synucleinopathies may be key for identifying novel treatment targets and improving clinical outcomes. While causative treatment is not yet available, improvement of quality of life can be achieved by personalized symptomatic treatment r...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Researchers here suggest a possible explanation for the observed association between disrupted sleep in later life and the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Sleep appears necessary to clear out tau produced during waking hours, and loss of sleep means raised levels of tau persist. The more tau in circulation, the more that an altered form of tau will be generated and aggregate into neurofibrillary tangles to damage brain cells. More research would be needed to quantify the size of this effect in comparison to, say, the contributions of lack of exercise or obesity. In the long run, however, one would hope ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: The Lancet NeurologyAuthor(s): Michael R Irwin, Michael V VitielloSummaryNearly half of all adults older than 60 years of age report sleep disturbance, as characterised either by reports of insomnia complaints with daytime consequences, dissatisfaction with sleep quality or quantity, or the diagnosis of insomnia disorder. Accumulating evidence shows that sleep disturbance contributes to cognitive decline and might also increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease dementia by increasing β-amyloid burden. That sleep disturbance would be a candidate risk factor for Al...
Source: The Lancet Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
We read an article written by Shi et al. (1) with interest. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 18 longitudinal studies to determine whether sleep disturbances (including insomnia, sleep disordered breathing, and other sleep problems) increase the risk of dementia. The meta-analysis was done by computing overall relative risk (RR) of incident dementia. The main findings from this study showed that sleep disturbances might increase risk of all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia.
Source: Sleep Medicine Reviews - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
This study is part of a growing body of research that suggests a sleep-deprived brain might be more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease. Animal studies have shown levels of plaque-forming A-beta plummet during sleep. Other research points to the fact that a sleeping brain runs the “clean cycle” (a reference to a dishwasher) to remove the day’s metabolic debris, specifically A-beta plaques. A study done in 2017 found that even one sleepless night appears to leave behind an excess of the troublesome protein fragment. While this is all impressive research, scientists believe there are still plenty of gap...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aging Alzheimer's Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Sleep Alzheimer's disease Dementia Source Type: blogs
Neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania found teenage who cut down on sleep were more likely to develop dangerous build-ups in their brain that paved the way to dementia.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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