Our 'inner salamander' could help treat arthritis, study finds

Research links human ability to regrow cartilage to molecules that help amphibians sprout new limbsContrary to popular opinion, humans can regrow cartilage in their joints, researchers have found. Experts hope the research could lead to new treatments for a common type of arthritis.Osteoarthritis, in which joints become painful and stiff, is the most common form of arthritis and is thought to cause pain in about 8.5 million people in the UK alone. It is caused by a breakdown in the cartilage that protects the ends of the bones, as well as the growth of new bone around the joint as the body tries to repair the damage.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Osteoarthritis Science Medical research Health Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 9 September 2019Source: Life SciencesAuthor(s): Ramin Pourakbari, Meysam Khodadadi, Ali Aghebati-Maleki, Leili Aghebati-Maleki, Mehdi YousefiAbstractOsteoarthritis is a prevalent worldwide joint disease, which demonstrates a remarkable adverse effect on the patients' life modality. Medicinal agents, exclusively nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), have been routinely applied in the clinic. But, their effects are restricted to pain control with insignificant effects on cartilage renovation, which would finally lead to cartilage destruction. In the field of regenerative medicine, ...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Ochronosis is a very rare disease in Asia. This paper supplies new information for study of this disease. The mechanism is still unknown right now. Further studies will be necessary.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
This study elucidates the potential to use mitochondria from different donors (PAMM) to treat UVR stress and possibly other types of damage or metabolic malfunctions in cells, resulting in not only in-vitro but also ex-vivo applications. Gene Therapy in Mice Alters the Balance of Macrophage Phenotypes to Slow Atherosclerosis Progression https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/07/gene-therapy-in-mice-alters-the-balance-of-macrophage-phenotypes-to-slow-atherosclerosis-progression/ Atherosclerosis causes a sizable fraction of all deaths in our species. It is the generation of fatty deposits in blood vessel...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This popular science article from the AARP is representative of the sort of outsider's view of the longevity industry that is presently dominant. On the one hand, it is good that the media and advocacy organizations such as AARP are finally talking seriously about treating aging as a medical condition. On the other hand, the author looks at two of the most popular areas of development, mTOR inhibitors and senolytics, in a way that makes them seem more or less equivalent, and then further adds diet and exercise as another equivalent strategy. This will be continuing issue, I fear. People, as a rule, don't think about size o...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study was designed to determine the effect and mechanism of PL on osteoarthritis (OA). An arthritis model was established to mimic human OA by intra-articular injection of monoiodoacetate (MIA) to Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The model was weekly treated with PL by intra-articular injection. Thermal withdrawal latency, mechanical withdrawal threshold, and treadmill gait were tested for pain behavior observation. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted for evaluating cartilage degradation. Real time PCRs and Western blots were conducted to elucidate the mechanism of PL on primary chondrocytes. Re...
Source: Aging - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: Aging (Albany NY) Source Type: research
Zhi-Chao Hu1,2,3†, Zu-Cheng Luo1,2,3†, Bing-Jie Jiang1,2,3†, Xin Fu1,2,3, Jiang-Wei Xuan1,2,3, Xiao-Bin Li1,2,3, Yu-Jie Bian1,2,3, Wen-Fei Ni1,2,3* and Ji-Xin Xue1,2,3* 1Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital and Yuying Children’s Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China 2The Second School of Medicine, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China 3Bone Research Institute, The Key Orthopaedic Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, Wenzhou, China Osteoarthritis (OA), defined as a long-term progressive joint disease, is characterized by cartilage impairment and ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, long-term aerobic exercise appears to attenuate the decline in endothelial vascular function, a benefit which is maintained during chronological aging. However, currently there is not enough evidence to suggest that exercise interventions improve vascular function in previously sedentary healthy older adults. Hijacking the Proteasome to Dispose of Unwanted Molecules in Age-Related Disease https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/hijacking-the-proteasome-to-dispose-of-unwanted-molecules-in-age-related-disease/ Cells are equipped with a protein disposal system in the form of the proteaso...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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