Concurrent Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation and Hiatal Hernia Repair for Refractory GERD Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10 to 20% in western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity (1). The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone Laparoscopic Roux En Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et al in their 2009 meta-analysis demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity following LRYGB(2).
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research

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Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective treatment for morbid obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) 1. Despite majority of patients with resolution of GERD after RYGB, some patients will continue to complain of significant, persistent reflux symptomatology or develop de novo symptoms despite aggressive medical management. It ’s true incidence is unknown and one study showed an improvement in GERD but not resolution in 22% of patients after RYGB with GERD2. Possible mechanisms may include primary lower esophageal sphincter incompetence, disruption of the angle of His or development of hiatal hernia...
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: VIDEO CASE REPORT Source Type: research
In the paper by Angrisani et  al. [1], the authors tackle an important question, namely, what are the long-term outcomes regarding gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG)? Many surgeons consider GERD to be the Achilles’ heel of the SG, and it is one of the main reasons for conver sion of the SG to other procedures, such as the gastric bypass [2]. The last International Consensus Conference on SG demonstrated>50% of surgeons considered GERD to be a relative contraindication to the SG, and also hiatal hernias (HH) should be repaired when encountered [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial comment Source Type: research
In the paper by Angrisani et al, the authors tackle an important question, namely; what are the long term outcomes regarding gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) [1]? Many surgeons consider GERD to be the Achilles heel of the SG, and it is one of the main reasons for conversion of the SG to other procedures such as the gastric bypass [2]. The last International Consensus Conference on SG demonstrated that over 50% of surgeons considered GERD to be a relative contrindication to the SG, and also that hiatal hernias (HH) should be repaired when encountered [3].
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Tertiary-care referral hospital.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
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Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Hiatal hernia repair is an essential step to reduce the incidence of gastroesophageal acid reflux disease in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy. The safety of addition, a hiatal hernia repair to sleeve gastrectomy, is a critical question.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Hiatal hernia repair is an essential step to reduce the incidence of gastroesophageal acid reflux disease in patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy. The safety of addition, an hiatal hernia repair to sleeve gastrectomy, is a critical question.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has a reported incidence of between 10% and 20% in Western populations with an even higher incidence in populations with obesity [1]. The vast majority of patients are managed medically with surgical intervention undertaken in those with recalcitrant GERD. Populations with obesity and recalcitrant GERD who are interested in weight loss surgery have historically undergone laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). De Goot et  al. [2], in their 2009 meta-analysis, demonstrated improvement in GERD in people with obesity after LRYGB.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Video case report Source Type: research
Hiatal hernia (HH) repair during laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has been advocated to reduce postoperative gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or intrathoracic migration (ITM) incidence. Previous,mid-term Results of a prospective, comparative study evaluating posterior cruroplasty concomitant with LSG (group A 48 patients with simple vs. group B 48 reinforced with bioabsorbable mesh) confirmed the safety and effectiveness of simultaneous procedures. Present aim: to report the 60 months follow-up update, evaluating GERD, esophageal lesions ’ incidence and HH’s recurrence.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
This study describes changes in GERD symptoms in patients undergoing LSG and HHR.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Acid Reflux | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Gastrectomy | Gastric Bypass | Gastroenterology | Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease | Gastroschisis Repair | GERD | Hernia Repair | Laparoscopy | Obesity | Surgery | Weight Loss