Postcolonoscopy Appendicitis: A Review of 57 Cases

The purpose of this study is to review the cases of postcolonoscopy appendicitis (PCA) reported in the literature. A comprehensive search using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Scholar identified 57 cases. The median age at presentations of PCA was 55 years. PCAs typically occurred during the first 24 hours after colonoscopy, and the majority developed after diagnostic colonoscopy. Clinical presentations were similar to those with common acute appendicitis, though with a high perforation rate. Most patients were correctly diagnosed using ultrasound or computed tomography scan. Treatment included open appendicectomy, laparoscopic appendicectomy or cecotomy, radiologic drainage of the abscess, nonoperative treatment with antibiotics. In addition to barotrauma, fecalith impaction into the appendiceal lumen, direct trauma to the appendiceal orifice, and underlying ulcerative colitis, a pre-existing subclinical disease of the appendix seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis. For PCA, timely diagnosis and management are crucial to attain a satisfactory outcome.
Source: Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques - Category: Surgery Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research

Related Links:

ConclusionsThe association of gene variants on risk of appendicitis and its severity suggest an etiologic role of genetically regulated inflammatory response. This may have implications for understanding the prognosis of untreated appendicitis as a possible self-limiting disorder and for understanding the inverse association of appendicitis with ulcerative colitis.
Source: International Journal of Colorectal Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
PMID: 31826282 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Zeitschrift fur Gastroenterologie - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Z Gastroenterol Source Type: research
PMID: 31639214 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Br J Surg Source Type: research
PMID: 31639212 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Br J Surg Source Type: research
PMID: 31639211 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Br J Surg Source Type: research
PMID: 31639201 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The British Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Br J Surg Source Type: research
In the first episode of Not Crazy or the final episode of A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic and a Podcast, Gabe and Michelle reminisce on past episodes, and Michelle tells us what her plans are for the future. Later, Michelle gives some words of wisdom to Gabe’s new co-host, Jackie Zimmerman. We get to know Jackie and discuss how Gabe and Jackie will be taking over BSP, but with a slightly new direction and a new name! Listen Now to get all the details. SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW About The Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Il...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Self-Help Source Type: blogs
This study aimed to analyse the effect of appendicectomy in patients with refractory ulcerative colitis. METHODS: In this prospective multicentre cohort series, all consecutive patients with refractory ulcerative colitis referred for proctocolectomy between November 2012 and June 2015 were counselled to undergo laparoscopic appendicectomy instead. The primary endpoint was clinical response (reduction of at least 3 points in the partial Mayo score) at 12 months and long-term follow-up. Secondary endpoints included endoscopic remission (endoscopic Mayo score of 1 or less), failure (colectomy or start of experimen...
Source: The British Journal of Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Br J Surg Source Type: research
Okazaki
Source: The American Journal of Gastroenterology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
The abdomen is a big place even in a small person. Gastrointestinal trauma can result in injury to the stomach, small bowel, colon, or rectum. Traumatic causes include blunt or penetrating trauma, such as gunshot wounds, stabbings, motor vehicle collisions, and crush injuries. Nontraumatic causes include appendicitis, Crohn disease, cancer, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, blockage of the bowel, and chemotherapy. The mechanism of injury will affect both the nature and severity of any resulting injuries. Treatment must address the critical and emergent nature of these injuries as well as issues that affect all trauma sit...
Source: Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America - Category: Nursing Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Appendicitis | Colonoscopy | CT Scan | Endoscopy | Inflammatory Bowel Disease | Laparoscopy | PET Scan | Study | Surgery | Ulcerative Colitis | Ultrasound