Drinking by prospective fathers tied to infant heart defects

(Reuters Health) - Fathers who drink alcohol in the months just before their child is conceived are more likely to have a baby with heart defects than those who abstain prior to conception, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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By Emma Young If you ever daydream about retirement, what do you picture? Lie-ins, instead of being woken by an alarm? Walks on a beach, in place of the morning commute? More time for beloved hobbies? Or perhaps endless open, solitary days, with nothing much to do…? Retirement is what psychologists term a “major life transition”. As such, it’s regarded as a stressor that carries risks as well as potential rewards. Now that the number of retirees in many countries is soaring, so too is the number of studies into whether retirement is good for your mental and physical health — or not. This...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Health Mental health Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Alcohol consumption during pregnancy has long been linked to congenital defects and developmental problems in newborns. Now a new study has found a link between a baby’s congenital heart defects and their prospective parents’ drinking before conception. Compared to non-drinkers, fathers who drank during the three months before conception were 44% more likely to have babies born with congenital heart disease. If the prospective dads were binge drinkers, which was defined as downing five or more drinks per session, there was a 52% higher likelihood their baby would have a congenital heart defect. Pr...
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Alcohol consumption during pregnancy has long been linked to congenital defects and developmental problems in newborns. Now a new study has found a link between a baby's congenital heart defects and their prospective parents' drinking before conception.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Much has been made lately of millennials drinking less—and as America’s younger generations shift toward sobriety, recent research suggests the opposite is happening among its older ones. A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that, from 2015-2017, more than 10% of adults 65 and older said they had binge drank—defined as consuming five or more drinks in one sitting for men, or four or more for women— in the past month, up from about 7% in 2006. That’s in keeping with other studies that have charted increases in excessive drinking among elderly adults, inc...
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We describe one such approach, albumin binding, and explain how it was applied in the development of the human GLP-1 analog liraglutide once daily and, subsequently, semaglutide once weekly. The pharmacology of these two long-acting GLP-1 analogs, in terms of improving glycemic control, reducing body weight and decreasing cardiovascular (CV) risk, is also reviewed, together with some novel biology. In addition, we describe the importance of accurate target (GLP-1 receptor) tissue expression analysis. Now an established class of agents, GLP-1-based therapies represent a significant advance in the treatment of T2D. All curr...
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 In his teens, Tony Hoffman was a BMX Amateur being featured on magazine covers. But soon after, he was a drug addict living in the streets and ultimately ending in prison. After his parole, a now clean Tony returned to the BMX world in a big way: by taking the silver medal in the 2016 Olympics. Since then, Tony has dedicated his life to helping others with addiction issues with his motivational speaking and special projects. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest After paroling prison on December 13, 2008, Tony Hoffman started living out his dream, with his addiction behind...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Recovery Sports The Psych Central Show Addiction BMX Gabe Howard Olympics prison Tony Hoffman Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
 In his teens, Tony Hoffman was a BMX Amateur being featured on magazine covers. But soon after, he was a drug addict living in the streets and ultimately ending in prison. After his parole, a now clean Tony returned to the BMX world in a big way: by taking the silver medal in the 2016 UCI BMX World Championships. Since then, Tony has dedicated his life to helping others with addiction issues with his motivational speaking and special projects. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest After paroling prison on December 13, 2008, Tony Hoffman started living out his dream, with h...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Recovery Sports The Psych Central Show Addiction BMX Gabe Howard Olympics prison Tony Hoffman Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
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No one ever had fun visiting the cardiologist. ­Regardless of how good the doc might be, it’s always a little scary thinking about the health of something as fundamental as the heart. But there are ways to take greater control—to ensure that your own heart health is the best it can be—even if you have a family history of cardiovascular disease. Although 50% of cardiovascular-disease risk is genetic, the other 50% can be modified by how you live your life, according to Dr. Eugenia Gianos, director of Women’s Heart Health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “This means you can greatly ...
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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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