Would you get injected with HERPES to treat skin cancer? New therapy uses the STI to attack tumors 

Bill Tripoli, of Louisiana, was diagnosed with melanoma in 2014. He was then treated with a drug that injects a genetically modified version of the herpes virus directly into tumors.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Abstract Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications and with the approval of Glybera (Alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20:1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a fatal form of brain cancer, and i...
Source: Herpes - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
We describe a case series of nine patients with metastatic melanoma and injectable lesions who developed progressive disease under a PD-1 inhibitor monotherapy. At the time of progressive disease, patients received intratumoral IL-2 treatment in addition to PD-1 inhibitor therapy. Three patients showed complete, three patients partial response and three patients progressive disease upon this combination therapy. IHC stainings were performed from metastases available at baseline (start of PD-1 inhibitor) and under combination therapy with IL-2. IHC results revealed a significant increase of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a highe...
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
ConclusionThe new HSV-1 based platform described provides a potent and versatile approach to developing new oncolytic immunotherapies for clinical use. Each of the modifications employed was demonstrated to aid in optimizing the potential of the virus to both directly kill tumors and to lead to systemic therapeutic benefit. For clinical use, these viruses are expected to be most effective in combination with other anti-cancer agents, in particular PD1/L1-targeted immune checkpoint blockade. The first virus from this program (expressing GALV-GP-R− and hGM-CSF) has entered clinical development alone and in combination ...
Source: Journal for Immunotherapy of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Abstract Administration of oncolytic viruses (OVs) is an emerging anticancer strategy that exploits the lytic nature of viral replication to enhance the killing of malignant cells. OVs can be used as tools to directly induce cancer cell death and to trigger local and/or systemic immune responses to metastatic cancer in vivo. The effectiveness of OV therapy was initially highlighted by the clinical use of the genetically modified herpes virus, talimogene laherparepvec, for melanoma therapy. A number of OVs are now being evaluated as potential treatments for cancer in clinical trials. In spite of being engineered to...
Source: Virus Research - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Virus Res Source Type: research
An oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has proven amenable in oncolytic virotherapy and was approved to treat melanoma. The immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 encoded by gene UL54 is essential for HSV infection. Post-transcriptional modification of UL54 would increase tumor targeting of oHSVs. However, UL54 gene transcription regulatory sequences and factors were not reported yet. Here we isolated a new strain LXMW of type 1 HSV (HSV-1-LXMW) in China and found it's closely related to HSV-1 strains Patton and H129 in the US by the first and next generation DNA sequencing viral DNA phylogenetic analysis. Using a weight mat...
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
a Schmidt The major type I interferon-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) surround and infiltrate certain tumors like malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer, and ovarian and breast cancer. The presence of pDC in these tumors is associated with an unfavorable prognosis for the patients as long as these cells are unstimulated. Upon activation by synthetic Toll-like receptor agonists or viruses, however, pDC develop cytotoxic activities. Viruses have the additional advantage to augment cytotoxic activities of pDC via lytic replication in malignant lesions. These effects turn cold tumors into hotspots, recruitin...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Gulcin Tezcan1, Ekaterina V. Martynova1, Zarema E. Gilazieva1, Alan McIntyre2, Albert A. Rizvanov1 and Svetlana F. Khaiboullina1,3* 1Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia 2Centre for Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States Inflammation has a crucial role in protection against various pathogens. The inflammasome is an intracellular multiprotein signaling complex that is linked to pathogen sensing and...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Conclusions Several model systems are now available to characterize the MSC-tumour interplay in the TME. These offer early promise in establishing robust preclinical platforms for the identification of crucial molecular pathways and for the assessment of clinical efficacy of novel drugs to inhibit cancer development and progression. However, selection of the right model for a given study should be shaped on the purpose, and should also consider fixed biological, biochemical, and biophysical parameters according to the specific tumour type. Finally, in order to get reliable and useful results to be translated to the clinic...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Caterina Curato1, Biana Bernshtein1, Eva Zupančič2, Almut Dufner3, Diego Jaitin1, Amir Giladi1, Eyal David1, Louise Chappell-Maor1, Dena Leshkowitz4, Klaus-Peter Knobeloch3, Ido Amit1, Helena F. Florindo2 and Steffen Jung1* 1Department of Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel 2Research Institute for Medicines (iMed.ULisboa), Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal 3Medical Faculty, Institute for Neuropathology, University Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany 4Life Science Core Facilities, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel Dendritic cells (DC) are unrivaled in thei...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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