These STDs Are the Most Common Infectious Diseases Reported to the CDC

Sexually transmitted disease diagnoses in 2018 broke a record for the fifth consecutive year, according to new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Chlamydia was the most common STD in 2018, with more than 1.7 million cases reported, followed by more than 580,000 cases of gonorrhea—3% and 5% increases over 2017, respectively. Though less common, syphilis diagnoses also rose, topping 115,000 cases in total, according to the CDC. “These are just infections that were diagnosed and reported,” says Elizabeth Torrone, an epidemiologist at the CDC. Since lots of STDs are asymptomatic, “many people have infections that never get diagnosed and reported. This really just gives us the minimum burden of the STD epidemic.” The report says chlamydia and gonorrhea also topped the CDC’s most recent list of “nationally notifiable” illnesses, a collection of about 120 infectious diseases and other conditions that local health departments report to the CDC. (Full 2018 data is not yet available; 2017 is the latest year on record.) Other common STDs, like HPV, are not considered nationally notifiable. Torrone says she’s particularly worried about the rise in syphilis, both among adults and babies who contract the infection from their mothers during pregnancy or delivery. About 1,300 cases of congenital syphilis were reported in 2018, a 40% increase over the year before, and the disease contributed to 94 infant...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized data visualization Infectious Disease Source Type: news

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Abstract This paper will report the findings of an education intervention performed by a workshop aimed to provide pregnant women with knowledge about pregnancy, delivery, breastfeeding and newborn care. A cross-sectional study, using a pre and post-intervention research design, was performed with 105 pregnant women from an obstetric service for a two-year period. Time points (pre and post) were compared using either Student t test and ANOVA. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. After the intervention all items increased their level from the three stations: antenatal care (20.4%), labor and delivery (36.8%) and po...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
za JP Abstract PRENACEL is a study that incorporates two innovative approaches to maternal and perinatal health: the need to improve women's level of satisfaction with the birthing experience and an assessment of the impacts of information and communication technologies in health. The approaches involve a communication program via short cellphone text messages, developed for Brazilian pregnant women in prenatal care in the Brazilian Unified National Health System. The analysis aims to determine whether the program contributes positively to women's perceived preparedness for childbirth. A randomized cluster trial w...
Source: Cadernos de Saude Publica - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Cad Saude Publica Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Low maternal 25(OH) D levels are common in southern China. However, low vitamin D status in pregnant women appears to be unrelated to PTB. Measuring vitamin D level alone is therefore not sufficient to predict PTB. PMID: 31617502 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Medical Science Monitor - Category: Research Tags: Med Sci Monit Source Type: research
This appeared last week:Only 15% of healthcare apps meet safety standards, research revealsOnly 15% of healthcare apps meet minimum safety standards, highlighting a “desperate need” for a proper review process, new research has concluded.Andrea Downey – Oct 9, 2019Health app evaluation organisation ORCHA evaluated more than 5,000 apps against 260 performance and compliance factors and found that majority do not meet the minimum safety requirements.Most no tably, 75% of apps aimed at people with blood pressure concerns and 85% of femtech and pregnancy apps do not meet ORCHA’s quality threshold.Liz As...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the hormonal profile, antral follicle count (AFC) and ovarian response of patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH).DesignObservational retrospective cohort including infertile women with HH undergoing assisted reproductive treatment (ART).SettingUniversity-affiliated infertility center.Patient(s)Thirty-three women with HH who underwent ART between January 2007 and September 2018. The control group comprised 66 age-matched counterparts with tubal or male factor infertility. The patients with an abnormal karyotype, and those presenting primary or secondary amenorrhea due to other causes, ...
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
The world is currently facing the largest health care worker shortage in history and Dr. Raj Panjabi, CEO and founder of Last Mile Health, believes he has a solution—but doctors are standing in the way. “Male-dominated professions are under-recognizing and under-valuing frontline caregivers, be they nurses, midwives or community health workers,” Panjabi said during an interview at the TIME 100 Health Summit on Thursday alongside TIME Nation Editor Haley Sweetland Edwards. Panjabi’s Last Mile Health trains individuals without a medical background to be community health workers, providing them with ba...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Health Care HealthSummit19 onetime Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS) – Not only do IUDs prevent pregnancy, they may lower the risk of ovarian cancer in the women who use them. Researchers at the University of Colorado reviewed a dozen prior studies involving several thousand patients and found that women who used IUDs were up to 32-percent less likely than other women to develop ovarian cancer. It’s not clear why, but scientists found that the hormones released by some IUDs may block estrogen which help ovarian tumor glow. And having a foreign body in the uterus may trigger the immune system to help fight cancer. Birth control pills have also been linked to a lower ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthwatch News Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall IUD ovarian cancer Source Type: news
This study not only represents the most systematic analysis of codon usage patterns in PEDV orf3 genes, but also provides a basic shaping mechanism of the codon usage bias.
Source: Research in Veterinary Science - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
myLAB Box, a healthcare company based in California, has developed and pioneered an at-home sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing service. With the number of STDs rising, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 20 mi...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs
Sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates in the U.S. are at a record high for the fourth year in a row, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All told, nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis were diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017. That’s 200,000 more cases than were diagnosed in 2016, a year that also had a record-high number of cases, according to the CDC. “We are now very concerned about this steep and sustained increase that we’re seeing,” says Dr. Gail Bolan, the director of the CDC’s Division of STD Prevention. “We’...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news
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