Skin autofluorescence: an emerging biomarker in persons with kidney disease

This article discusses mechanisms of AGE formation and reviews published literature on SAF as a biomarker and risk factor across the spectrum of kidney disease. Recent findings SAF is elevated in adults and children on dialysis. Higher SAF is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in persons receiving haemodialysis and for all-cause mortality in persons performing peritoneal dialysis, though the increase in discrimination when SAF was added to traditional risk factors was modest. In less advanced chronic kidney disease, higher SAF predicts all-cause mortality and progression. SAF is elevated in renal transplant recipients, but to a lesser extent than in dialysis patients. In one study, higher SAF predicted graft loss and mortality. SAF has been reported to be increased in patients with acute kidney injury. Summary A growing body of evidence attests that SAF, a marker of AGE accumulation, is a risk factor for mortality and kidney function decline in multiple types of kidney disease. Further studies are warranted to evaluate interventions to reduce SAF and the impact on clinical outcomes.
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: DIAGNOSTICS AND TECHNIQUES: Edited by Maarten W. Taal Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 16 January 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Jelmer K. Humalda, Gerald Klaassen, Hanne de Vries, Yvette Meuleman, Lara C. Verschuur, Elisabeth J.M. Straathof, Gozewijn D. Laverman, Willem Jan W. Bos, Paul J.M. van der Boog, Karin M. Vermeulen, Olivier A. Blanson Henkemans, Wilma Otten, Martin H. de Borst, Sandra van Dijk, Gerjan J. Navis, P.J.M. van der Boog, S. van Dijk, G.J. Navis, J.K. Humalda (project coordination), G. KlaassenRationale &ObjectivePatients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are particularly sensitive to dietary sodium. We evaluated a self-man...
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old man presented to the ED with a chief complaint of shortness of breath. His past medical history was significant for end-stage renal disease secondary to lithium toxicity, immunosuppression subsequent to cadaveric renal transplantation, bipolar disorder, and hypertension. His shortness of breath had begun 6 months previously and was initially intermittent; it then progressed to constant shortness of breath over the few weeks before presentation. He had no fever, hemoptysis, or chest pain. The patient was admitted to hospital for further evaluation. PMID: 31916972 ...
Source: Chest - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Chest Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
Conclusions. Transplant physicians should inform potential living kidney donors at risk for APOL1-associated nephropathy about the gene and possibility of genetic testing early in the donor evaluation, well before scheduling the donor nephrectomy. Transplant programs must weigh risks of performing a donor nephrectomy in those with 2 APOL1 renal risk variants (high-risk genotypes), particularly younger individuals. Our program counsels kidney donors with APOL1 high-risk genotypes in the same fashion as with risk genotypes in other nephropathy genes. Because most African American kidney donor candidates lacking hypertensio...
Source: Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Reviews Source Type: research
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Purpose of review Despite improvement in short-term renal allograft survival in recent years, renal transplant recipients (RTR) have poorer long-term allograft outcomes. Allograft function slowly declines with periods of stable function similar to natural progression of chronic kidney disease in nontransplant population. Nearly all RTR transitions to failing renal allograft (FRG) period and require transition to dialysis. Conservative chronic kidney disease management before transition to end-stage renal disease is an increasingly important topic; however, there is limited data in RTR regarding how to delay dialysis init...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: NOVEL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN NEPHROLOGY AND HYPERTENSION: Edited by Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh and Ekamol Tantisattamo Source Type: research
Purpose of review Dialysis has been the prevailing treatment paradigm in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) for patients ineligible for or unlikely to receive kidney transplantation. As dialysis may neither offer survival benefit nor improved quality of life in certain groups, there has been increasing interest in conservative management as an alternative approach. Recent findings Experts and workgroups suggest the main goals of conservative management are to optimize quality of life, treat symptoms of end-stage renal disease without dialysis or transplant, and improve survival and cardiovascular health. Given the ...
Source: Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: NOVEL THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES IN NEPHROLOGY AND HYPERTENSION: Edited by Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh and Ekamol Tantisattamo Source Type: research
2017 ended as a banner year for my family, but things didn’t look great at the start. A death sentence met us in a boxing ring, and we had to school ourselves on fighting to live. I never thought much about the 37 million American adults who suffer from kidney disease until my husband Neil became one of them. Celebrating our first year of marriage in 2001, we learned by accident through an unrelated medical exam that my husband has polycystic kidney disease, an illness which causes the kidneys to fill with cysts over time, rendering the organs unable to function properly. There is no cure. There was nothing to do but...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Healthcare medicine public health Source Type: news
This study was conducted on 80 participants who were classified into three groups: Group I (30 CKD patients with mean age 53 ± 12 years), Group II (30 patients with end-stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis with mean age 48 ± 14.8 years) and Group III having 20 healthy age-and sex-matched controls. Serum chemerin level, fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR index calculation, urea, creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, total cholesterol, and triglyceride were measured. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In Groups I and II, we found a significantly high...
Source: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl Source Type: research
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