Flu Season Has Arrived: Dozens Of Cases Confirmed In Massachusetts

BOSTON (CBS) – Flu season has arrived in Massachusetts. The Department of Public Health reported Monday that there have been 82 lab-confirmed cases of the flu since September. That number is normal for this time of year, the department said. Residents are being urged to get vaccinated. “We don’t know how severe this year’s flu season will be, but we do know that the flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself, your family, and everyone around you,” said Public Health Commissioner Monica Bharel in a statement. “Although the flu vaccine won’t prevent every case of the flu, it’s still the most effective way to reduce your risk of serious illness.” Flu Season Arrives with Reminder to Get Vaccinated: https://t.co/zSDnmH2rye pic.twitter.com/xaJrsVbhua — Mass. Public Health (@MassDPH) October 7, 2019 Massachusetts has one of the highest rates of flu vaccination among children and adolescents. Last year, 81 percent of children between 6 months and 17 years old got vaccinated. The flu infects millions in the United States every year, killing thousands. Common symptoms are fever, cough and sore throat. A list of places where the flu vaccine is available can be found at https://vaccinefinder.org/ In addition to getting vaccinated, the department recommends that people wash their hands regularly, cover their mouths with their sleeve when they cough or sneeze, and stay home from school or work if they feel sick.
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Flu Source Type: news

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Conclusions: From 2011 to 2016, influenza-associated SARI hospitalization rates in children aged younger than 5 years of age in Suzhou, China, were high, particularly among children 0–5 months of age. Higher hospitalization rates were observed in years where the predominant circulating virus was influenza A/H3N2. Immunization for children> 6 months, and maternal and caregiver immunization for those
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
By MARC M. BEUTTLER, MD Every year at this time, you hear warnings that flu season has arrived. New data from the CDC indicates the season is far from over. So, you are urged by health authorities to get a flu shot. What you may not realize is how the flu can affect the hospitals you and your loved ones rely on for care.   In January, the large urban hospital where I am an intern faced the worst flu outbreak it has ever seen. Nearly 100 staff members tested positive for the flu. Residents assigned to back-up coverage were called to work daily to supplement the dwindling ranks of the sick. Every hospital vis...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Hospitals Medical Practice Marc Beuttler Vaccination Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: The XCP rate and the percentage of specimens positive for Cp increased in early 2014, peaking in May. Only 12% of trainees with laboratory-confirmed Cp were febrile. Historically, acute respiratory disease surveillance at military training centers focused on febrile diseases, particularly those caused by adenoviruses. With introduction of an adenovirus vaccine in late 2011, respiratory disease rates dropped with only sporadic occurrences of adenovirus-associated disease. In 2012, the San Diego surveillance program began providing data on multiple respiratory disease agents, in addition to adenoviruses and influ...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 November 2018Source: The Lancet Respiratory MedicineAuthor(s): Shuo Feng, Susan S Chiu, Eunice L Y Chan, Mike Y W Kwan, Joshua S C Wong, Chi-Wai Leung, Yiu Chung Lau, Sheena G Sullivan, J S Malik Peiris, Benjamin J CowlingSummaryBackgroundThe protection conferred by influenza vaccination is generally thought to last less than a year, necessitating annual revaccination. However, the speed with which influenza vaccine effectiveness might decline during a year is unknown, which is of particular importance for locations with year-round influenza activity. We aimed to assess how influenza v...
Source: The Lancet Respiratory Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
Influenza has been impacting public health on a global scale since the beginning of recorded history. Influenza, also known as the “flu,” has numerous organizations committed to public health research, developing vaccines, and educating best practices preparing for the upcoming flu season. By gaining an understanding of the flu through history, virology, and how it impacts our society, we can have a better appreciation for the commitment that’s involved with combating the flu. What Is Influenza (and What’s Not)? The eyes of an epidemiologist can twitch for a variety of reasons, one of them being whe...
Source: JEMS Operations - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Exclusive Articles Operations Source Type: news
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Last year, a 26-year-old man receiving treatment for leukemia went to a Swiss hospital's emergency room with a fever, a sore throat, and a cough, and was admitted. His condition worsened, and 17 days later, he died from severe complications of measles. The man's weakened immune system was unable to fight off the disease, even though he was vaccinated against measles as a child.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
In conclusion, we demonstrated a simple generation-dependent model that was able to adequately capture an observed transmission pattern of the measles outbreak in Japan, 2018. The proposed model also helped predict the future incidence and evaluate public health control measures. Polishing the forecasting model further, we can achieve an eventual routine forecast and evaluation the outbreaks while maintaining the model structure as simple as possible. Competing Interests The authors declare no competing interests. Data Availability The code snippets used for simulations and generation of figures as well as the epidemiolo...
Source: PLOS Currents Outbreaks - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
Your nose is dripping like a leaky faucet, your throat is sore and you can’t stop sneezing. You don’t have a fever, but you feel wiped out—like you could curl up on the floor and fall asleep. Do you have a cold or the flu? If you guessed cold, you’re probably right. But experts say that differentiating the common cold (an upper respiratory infection) from the flu (influenza) can be trickier than most people assume. “There is huge overlap among non-influenza viruses and the symptoms produced by influenza and other bugs,” says Dr. Bruce Barrett, a professor of family medicine and community...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
The 2017-2018 flu season was a bad one. The dominant viral strain, H3N2, was a particularly severe form of influenza, leading to widespread and serious illness across the country. The flu and its complications killed around 80,000 people last year, the CDC estimates, including 180 children. That’s the highest flu death toll in four decades. Experts say early indications suggest that this year’s flu season will be milder, but the memory of last winter should still serve as motivation to get the flu shot this fall. Here’s what you need to know about the 2018 flu shot. When should I get the flu shot? The CD...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news
Abstract Travelers to developing regions are at risk for development of influenza-like illness (ILI). Little is known of traveler and trip characteristics associated with the development of ILI. TravMil is a prospective observational study, enrolling subjects presenting to six military travel clinics or predeployment-screening sites. We analyzed pre- and post-travel surveys from travelers visiting regions outside of the continental United States, Western or Northern Europe, Canada, Australia, or New Zealand between January 2010 and March 2016. Influenza-like illness was defined as a self-reported fever associated ...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
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