Hypertension in Pregnancy May Portend Cardiovascular Ills in Mothers

Pre-eclampsia was tied to a higher risk of stroke, heart attacks and other problems in mothers.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Blood Pressure Heart Preeclampsia Source Type: news

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ConclusionMigraines have a high incidence in gynaecology and obstetrics. Health care providers must include screening questions when history taking to identify women with migraines and effectively manage them. Proper follow-up and treatment is required for all women with migraines in order to minimize the risk of cerebrovascular events, and negative pregnancy outcomes. Women with migraines are advised to avoid combined hormonal contraception and use progesterone only pills.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Stroke is the major cause of maternal mortality associated with preeclampsia or eclampsia. All but one patient in this series of strokes demonstrated severe elevation of systolic blood pressure, whereas other variables were less consistently observed. Antihypertensive treatment was not implemented in the majority of cases. Opportunities for care improvement exist and may significantly affect maternal mortality. PMID: 31135728 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
Women who experience hypertensive disorders of pregnancy have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, stroke, and ischaemic heart disease later in life.1 –3 This risk is evident shortly after an affected pregnancy and persists for decades.4 The mechanism underlying this association is not known, particularly whether women who develop hypertensive disorders are at higher risk pre-pregnancy and pregnancy unmasks their cardiovascular risk, or whether hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are an index event causing cardiovascular damage.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Full length article Source Type: research
Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) complicate approximately 5 –10% of pregnancies. In the past 20 years, the incidence of HDPs has increased by 25%.1 These disorders, combined with delayed or inadequate treatment of severe systolic hypertension, continue to be leading causes of maternal death; nearly one woman dies every day in the United States of America (USA) and there are an additional 50–60 000 deaths per year worldwide.2,3 A vast majority of deaths result from hemorrhagic stroke and the complications of seizures.
Source: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Review article Source Type: research
DiscussionCurrent practice in the UK at the time of trial commencement for management of pre-eclampsia varies by gestation. Previous trials have shown that in women with pre-eclampsia after 37  weeks of gestion, delivery is initiated, as maternal complications are reduced without increasing fetal risks. Prior to 34 weeks of gestation, usual management aims to prolong pregnancy for fetal benefit, unless severe complications occur, necessitating preterm delivery. This trial aims to addr ess the uncertainty for women where the balance of benefits and risks of delivery compared to expectant management are uncerta...
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Authors: Abstract Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to initiate the...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
We report the case of a woman with severe headache associated with visual disturbances, without hypertension or proteinuria at 32 weeks of pregnancy. MRI revealed multiple recent cerebral vascular accidents. An echocardiogram detected a papillary fibroelastoma of 5mm. Maternal fetal experts determined it safe to continue the pregnancy. Childbirth at 39 weeks was normal uneventful for the newborn and mother. In the postpartum, despite the theoretical operative indication to resect the small residual papillary fibroelastoma, the patient was followed expectantly because of the stable neuro-cardiologic state. A fibroelastoma c...
Source: Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angeiologie - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Ann Cardiol Angeiol (Paris) Source Type: research
Authors: Abstract Acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both can occur during the prenatal, intrapartum, or postpartum periods. Pregnant women or women in the postpartum period with acute-onset, severe systolic hypertension; severe diastolic hypertension; or both require urgent antihypertensive therapy. Introducing standardized, evidence-based clinical guidelines for the management of patients with preeclampsia and eclampsia has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of adverse maternal outcomes. Individuals and institutions should have mechanisms in place to initiate the...
Source: Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
This article discusses pregnancy-related considerations for meningioma, pituitary disorders, demyelinating disease, myasthenia gravis, thyroid eye disease, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, stroke, migraine, and cranial neuropathies. The article also details the potential neuro-ophthalmic complications of preeclampsia and eclampsia and reviews the use of common diagnostic studies during pregnancy.
Source: Neurologic Clinics - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Labetalol treatment was appropriately initiated in many cases; however, protocol adherence could greatly improve. Potential factors affecting protocol compliance include shift changes, communication issues, and conflicting protocols. Institutions should review protocol compliance to improve care. PMID: 30227906 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Permanente journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: Perm J Source Type: research
More News: Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Health | Heart | Hypertension | Pre-eclampsia | Pregnancy | Stroke