Psychiatrists Can Do More to Help Patients Quit Smoking, Addiction Experts Say

Several medications are proven to help people stop smoking, but few patients with tobacco use disorder are being offered them, according to addiction experts at APA ’s IPS: The Mental Health Services Conference in New York.Despite the higher rates of smoking by people with mental illness compared with those without mental illness, only a quarter of facilities that treat patients with substance use disorders in the United States offer nicotine replacement therapy or medication treatment, and two-thirds allow tobacco use on their grounds, explained session chair Michael Brus, M.D., a clinical instructor of psychiatry at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, during the session “The Deadliest Drug Epidemic: How Psychiatrists and the Media Miss the Boat on Tobacco Addiction, and What to Do About It.” Brus called for psychiatrists to do more to address tobacco use in this population.To help patients successfully quit tobacco, Jill Williams, M.D., director of the Division of Addiction Psychiatry at the Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, said psychiatrists should regularly ask patients about their tobacco use, and if they do use tobacco, advise patients on the risks of such use and refer them to treatment such as behavioral counseling.Psychiatrists should also strongly consider prescribing smoking cessation medications, including varenicline, which is underused despite strong evidence of safety and efficacy.Brus highlighted a2016 study known a...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: abstinence addiction behavioral counseling bupropion EAGLES IPS Jill Williams Michael Brus nicotine replacement therapy smoking tobacco use disorder varenicline Source Type: research

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New research appearing in the journal Addiction shows that the number of deaths attributed to opioid-related overdoses could be 28 percent higher than reported due to incomplete death records. This discrepancy is more pronounced in several states, including Alabama, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, and Indiana, where the estimated number of deaths more than doubles – obscuring the scope of the opioid crisis and potentially affecting programs and funding intended to confront the epidemic.
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Hanna MN, Chambers C, Punyala A, Iqbal A, Singh B, Oruc C, Prakash P, Prajapati Y, Wang Y, Amery Ai Z, Shechter R, Speed TJ, Koch CG, Williams K Abstract The use of opioid analgesics for pain management has increased dramatically over the past decade, with corresponding increases in negative sequelae including overdose and death. Physicians, policymakers, and researchers are focused on finding ways to decrease opioid use and overdose. This crisis calls for a coordinated response that includes the entire healthcare sector. In this work, the authors lay out a blueprint for such a response at the level of the...
Source: Journal of Opioid Management - Category: Addiction Tags: J Opioid Manag Source Type: research
(HARTFORD, Conn.) — A coalition of 39 states will look into the marketing and sales of vaping products by Juul Labs, including whether the company targeted youths and made misleading claims about nicotine content in its devices, officials announced Tuesday. Attorneys general from Connecticut, Florida, Nevada, Oregon and Texas said they will lead the multi-state investigation into San Francisco-based Juul, which also is facing lawsuits by teenagers and others who say they became addicted to the company’s vaping products. The state officials said they also will investigate the company’s claims about the ris...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Courts onetime Vaping Source Type: news
To the Editor The Viewpoint by Dwarakanath provided a thoughtful description of the adolescent opioid use disorder (OUD) epidemic and the limited access to recommended care. The remedy presented was requiring pediatric residents to take an 8-hour course and become waivered to prescribe buprenorphine. Pediatric residents ’ exposure to addiction medicine is so limited that this would be quantitatively more training than many now receive. However, the goals should be to increase treatment capacity and improve the quality of care in this domain, not just a numerical increase in hours of exposure. For these goals to b e a...
Source: JAMA Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Given increasing rates of opioid addiction and death, viable solutions are universally needed. Successful intervention measures should be widely shared between military, veteran, and civilian healthcare and public health communities. Increased collaboration between these groups could inculcate successful programs to prevent and decrease opioid use. Results received from recent military and veterans' programs for prescription and electronic medical record (EMR) monitoring and data sharing may also prove useful for civilian healthcare providers and hospital systems. Future evaluations from ongoing federally fund...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
Abstract BACKGROUND: Emerging data points to a potential heroin use epidemic in South Africa. Despite this, access to methadone maintenance therapy and other evidence-based treatment options remains negligible. We aimed to assess retention, changes in substance use and quality of life after 6 months on methadone maintenance therapy provided through a low-threshold service in Durban, South Africa. METHODS: We enrolled a cohort of 54 people with an opioid use disorder into the study. We reviewed and described baseline socio-demographic characteristics. Baseline and 6-month substance use was assessed using ...
Source: Addiction Science and Clinical Practice - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Sci Clin Pract Source Type: research
New largescale study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found overprescription of opioids by dentists common, particularly to patients at high risk for substance abuse, and that almost 1/3 of patients received more powerful drugs than neededElsevierIMAGE: In this cross-sectional analysis of 542,958 dental visits by adult patients, between 1 in 4 and 1 in 2 opioid prescriptions exceeded the recommended morphine equivalents and days'supply for...viewmore Credit: Michelle S. Woods Ann Arbor, February 4, 2020 - Dentists are among top prescribers of opioids in the US, however, whether their opioid prescrib...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - Category: Dentistry Source Type: news
The opioid epidemic plaguing the country is hitting New Hampshire especially hard as one of the top five states most affected. The issue has become a top priority for Democratic primary candidates visiting rehab clinics across the state, though for many families, the damage is already done. Major Garrett speaks to members of the Wilson family, who dealt with several generations of drug addiction for the CBS News series Every State Has A Story.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Our ability to feel pain and react to it is both a boon and a curse, simultaneously. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) defines pain as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage.” This means that pain is highly subjective, and it is informed by a mix of past experiences, our current emotional state, and future expectations. Since pain is an emotional and sensory experience it affects our quality of life immensely, and treatment is complex. Chronic pain management with opioids is not ideal Opioids...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Mind body medicine Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Incredibly interesting story regarding the start of the opioid crisis in America. As an aspiring pharmacist entering my first year of pharmacy school I feel as though the opioid epidemic is something I will surely have to face in the future. I am wondering if any current Pharmacists have any stories they’d like to share with regards to dispensing opioids and/or other addictive medication and with dealing with the opioid epidemic.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pharmacy Source Type: forums
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