Dyadic Associations Between Body Mass Index and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes in Romantic Couples: Results From the Health and Retirement Study.

Dyadic Associations Between Body Mass Index and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes in Romantic Couples: Results From the Health and Retirement Study. Ann Behav Med. 2019 Oct 05;: Authors: Burns RJ Abstract BACKGROUND: Body mass index (BMI) is linked to Type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although romantic partners influence each other's health outcomes, it is unclear if partner's BMI is related to the development of T2D. PURPOSE: To test prospective, dyadic associations between BMI and the development of T2D in middle-aged and older adult couples over 8 years. METHODS: Data came from 950 couples in the Health and Retirement Study. Neither partner had diabetes at baseline (2006). The actor-partner interdependence model was used to examine dyadic associations between BMI at baseline and the development of T2D during the next 8 years. RESULTS: After adjusting for covariates, a significant actor effect was observed such that one's BMI at baseline was positively associated with one's own odds of developing T2D during follow-up (odds ratio [OR] = 1.08, p
Source: Annals of Behavioral Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Ann Behav Med Source Type: research

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