Expansive carotid artery remodeling: possible marker of vulnerable plaque.

This study aimed to define associations between ER and local risk factors, including CA geometry and traditional systemic risk factors for ischemic events, to determine whether ER could serve as a clinical marker of carotid vulnerable plaque. METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed 66 patients with CA stenosis who were scheduled to undergo carotid endarterectomy or CA stenting. They calculated ER ratios in the internal CA (ICA) from long-axis MR images and as the maximal distance between the lumen and the outer borders of the plaque perpendicular to the axis of the ICA/the maximal luminal diameter of the distal ICA at a region unaffected by atherosclerosis. Relative overall signal intensity (roSI) was calculated to assess intraplaque hemorrhage and defined as the signal intensity of plaque on an axial T1-weighted image with maximal stenosis relative to that of the adjacent sternocleidomastoid muscle. The authors evaluated CA geometry by calculating the angles between the common CA (CCA) and ICA, and between the CCA and external CA (ECA) using digital subtraction angiography. The ER ratios, age, sex, percentage of stenosis, roSI, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, low-density lipoprotein, statin medication, diabetes, smoking habit, and ischemic heart disease were compared between 33 symptomatic and 33 asymptomatic patients. The authors also compared symptomatic status, age, sex, percentage of stenosis, ICA angle, ECA angle, roSI, and other traditional atherosclerotic ris...
Source: Journal of Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: J Neurosurg Source Type: research

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It’s fairly established medical science that people who have had heart attacks can take regular low doses of aspirin to significantly lower their risk of having another heart attack, or other heart problems including stroke. But it is still an open question whether or not people who haven’t had a heart event, but are at higher risk of one (because, for example) they have diabetes, high blood pressure, or elevated cholesterol levels), can also benefit from the over-the-counter painkiller and anti-inflammatory drug. A new study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, adds to that debate by ad...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized aspirin Drugs Heart Disease Source Type: news
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
A sizable body of evidence, both mechanistic and epidemiological, supports the idea that exercise slows age-related cognitive decline. The report here is an example of the type, noting the results of a study in which some of the participants were assigned to an exercise program. The exercising participants exhibited a slower decline in cognitive function, particularly memory, in comparison to the others. This is a representative result: in general, the consensus in the scientific literature is that regular exercise is beneficial to cognitive function over the long term. Researchers theorized that the healthy lifes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs
This study was to evaluate the independent relationship between HbA1c and low ABI. METHODS: A total of 3102 subjects (male 1539, female 1563, aged 67.72±10.69 years) were enrolled into the study from 2010 to 2018. The odds ratio (OR) and Linear regression coefficient of low ABI group (defined as ABI≤0.9) and ABI value in associations with the HbA1c were modelled using multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses to adjust for possible confounders. RESULTS: Compared with participants with normal ABI, those presenting the low ABI showed a significantly older age, smoking rate, higher level of heart...
Source: International Angiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: Int Angiol Source Type: research
ConclusionsDiabetic nephropathy was common among Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care in Hong Kong. Early identification and control of the modifiable risk factors are of upmost importance in preventing the complication.
Source: Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
(CNN) — Leading nutritional experts in the United States and the UK are fired up about new dietary recommendations claiming there’s no need to reduce your red and processed meat intake for good health. “This is a very irresponsible public health recommendation,” said Dr. Frank Hu, who chairs the nutrition department at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The new guidelines and five corresponding studies are part of a systematic analysis of existing research done by NutriRECS, a recently formed international group of nutritionists and health researchers. NutriRECS says its mission is to &l...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local CNN Red Meat Source Type: news
Discussion of Developmental Effects on Aging Microtubule Function and Longevity in Nematodes Quantifying the Correlation Between Poverty and Faster Pace of Aging Matthew O'Connor Presenting on Underdog Pharmaceuticals at Undoing Aging 2019 https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/matthew-oconnor-presenting-on-underdog-pharmaceuticals-at-undoing-aging-2019/ Here Matthew O'Connor of the SENS Research Foundation talks about the research that led to founding of Underdog Pharmaceuticals, a biotech startup incubated by the foundation to commercialize a means of targeting 7-ketocholesterol in atheroscleros...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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