Optimism Tied to Lower Rates of Heart Attacks, Death Optimism Tied to Lower Rates of Heart Attacks, Death

People with a positive outlook on life may be less likely than pessimists to experience events like a heart attack or stroke, and they may live longer, a recent review of existing research suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

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Synthetic marijuana use has been reported in the last years as a possible causative factor of different cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, intracranial bleeding, and cerebral vasospasm. One case of aortic thrombosis was also reported, but that was in a patient using cocaine and synthetic marijuana together. A case of lower limb thromboembolism and synthetic marijuana use has not been reported to date. Intoxication, material impurity, blood vessel reactivity, and chemical interaction with other drugs have been proposed as possible mechanisms of these events.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Delayed progression of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients with atherosclerotic plaques; 3-year prevention with the supplementation with Pycnogenol®+Centellicum®. Minerva Cardioangiol. 2019 Oct 11;: Authors: Belcaro G, Cesarone MR, Scipione C, Scipione V, Dugall M, Shu H, Peterzan P, Corsi M, Luzzi R, Hosoi M, Feragalli B, Cotellese R Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was the evaluation of the progression of atherosclerosis and the occurrence of cardiovascular events in asymptomatic patients with atherosclerotic plaques (Class IV and V) and arterial wall ...
Source: Minerva Cardioangiologica - Category: Cardiology Tags: Minerva Cardioangiol Source Type: research
One of our residents who just graduated 3 months ago texted me this ECG:" Hey Steve, would be grateful for any thoughts on this EKG.  60-something with 2 days of waxing and waning epigastric pain and diaphoresis.  Also diffuse abdominal tenderness. "Presenting ECG:What was my answer?What is the management? My Answer: " Inferior and lateral OMI "Detailed Interpretation:Sinus rhythm.  Left axis deviation, but not quite LAFB (no r-wave in inferior leads; no q-wave in aVL).  There is less than 1 mm STE in inferior leads, with reciprocal ST depression. There are hyperacute T-wav...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care News Source Type: news
Performing this type of break once or twice weekly will half the risk of heart attack and stroke. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: Journal of the American College of RadiologyAuthor(s): Cindy Yuan, Kirti Kulkarni, Brittany Z. DashevskyAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the impact of comorbid conditions and age on mammography use.MethodsWe used data from the 2011 to 2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, which contained records for 40,752 women over the age of 40. Use was defined as a mammogram within the previous 1 or 2 years, analyzed separately. A logit model was employed to evaluate associations between use and comorbidities and age. Statistical significance was defined by a P value
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
(Reuters Health) - Women who go through menopause earlier in life may be more likely to have a heart attack or stroke before they reach age 60 than their counterparts who go through menopause later on, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Authors: Jeong MJ, Kwon H, Kim MJ, Han Y, Kwon TW, Cho YP Abstract Purpose: We aimed to compare clinical outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) between Korean patients with and without severe contralateral extracranial carotid stenosis or occlusion (SCSO). Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2014, a total of 661 patients who underwent 731 CEAs were stratified by SCSO (non-SCSO and SCSO groups) and analyzed retrospectively. The study outcomes included the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as stroke or myocardial infarction, and all-cause mortality during the perioperat...
Source: Annals of Surgical Treatment and Research - Category: Surgery Tags: Ann Surg Treat Res Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
(Reuters Health) - Experiencing a substantial drop in income may raise the risk of having a heart attack or stroke years later, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
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