Screening for differentiated thyroid cancer in selected populations

Publication date: Available online 4 October 2019Source: The Lancet Diabetes &EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Livia Lamartina, Giorgio Grani, Cosimo Durante, Sebastiano Filetti, David S CooperSummaryThe main purpose of cancer screening programmes should not be to detect all cancers, but to discover potentially fatal or clinically relevant cancers. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends against screening for thyroid cancer in the general, asymptomatic adult population, as such screening would result in harms that outweigh any potential benefits. This recommendation does not apply to patients with symptoms or to individuals at increased risk of thyroid cancer because of a history of exposure to ionising radiation (in childhood, as radioactive fallout, or in medical treatment as low-dose radiotherapy for benign conditions or high-dose radiation for malignancy), inherited genetic syndromes associated with thyroid cancer (eg, familial adenomatous polyposis), or one or more first-degree relatives with a history of thyroid cancer. We discuss the evidence for and against screening individuals who are at high risk, and consider the different screening tools available.
Source: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research

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Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
  Answer: No—unless you do it for more than a few months. After a few months, the upfront metabolic and weight benefits will begin to reverse and new health problems arise. We know this with confidence. I raise this question once again because more and more people are coming to me reporting problems. It may take months, even years, but the long-term consequences can be quite serious. Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is—without a doubt—an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, redu...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: ketones bowel flora ketogenic ketotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
Achieving ketosis by engaging in a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat lifestyle is an effective means of losing weight, breaking insulin and leptin resistance, reversing type 2 diabetes and fatty liver, reducing blood pressure, reversing the inflammation of visceral fat, and may even cause partial or total remission of selected cancers. So what’s the problem? The problem comes when people remain ketotic for extended periods. We know with confidence that long-term ketosis poses substantial risk for health complications because thousands of children have followed ketogenic diets over the years as a means of suppressing in...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Conclusion: To address the many challenges posed by EDCs, we argue that Africans should take the lead in prioritization and evaluation of environmental hazards, including EDCs. We recommend the institution of education and training programs for chemical users, adoption of the precautionary principle, establishment of biomonitoring programs, and funding of community-based epidemiology and wildlife research programs led and funded by African institutes and private companies. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1774 Received: 16 February 2017 Revised: 22 May 2017 Accepted: 24 May 2017 Published: 22 August 2017 Address correspond...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
Conclusions: Developmental exposure to 0.5 μg/kg BW/d of BPA, which is 8–10 times lower than the current preliminary EFSA (European Food Safety Authority) tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 4 μg/kg BW/d and is within the range of environmentally relevant levels, was associated with sex-specific differences in the expression of genes in adipose tissue plasma triglyceride levels in males and adipocyte cell density in females when F344 rat offspring of dams exposed to BPA at 0.5 μg/kg BW/d were compared with the offspring of unexposed controls. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP505 Received: 13 Ma...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The rate of late-onset endocrine complications among childhood cancer survivors has risen, with an estimated 50% of survivors experiencing complications ranging from thyroid dysfunction to obesity or type 2 diabetes during their lifetime, according to a study in theJournal of Clinical Oncology.Healio 
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control &Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Purpose The development of endocrinopathies in survivors of childhood cancer as they age remains understudied. We characterized endocrine outcomes in aging survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study on the basis of therapeutic exposures. Patients and Methods We analyzed self-reported conditions in 14,290 5-year survivors from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, with a median age 6 years (range,
Source: Journal of Clinical Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Long Term Survival & Late Effects, Rapid Communications, Rapid Communications Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Thyroid disorders, obesity, diabetes all increase over time
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
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