Analysis of Discharge Destination after Open vs. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lung Cancer.

Analysis of Discharge Destination after Open vs. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Lung Cancer. Ann Thorac Surg. 2019 Sep 30;: Authors: Bhagat R, Bronsert MR, Henderson WG, Scott CD, Weyant MJ, Mitchell JD, Fullerton DA, Meguid RA Abstract BACKGROUND: Patients express strong opinion over discharge destination-preferring discharge home versus elsewhere. As focus on patient satisfaction increases, we sought to understand differences in postoperative discharge destination after minimally invasive versus open anatomic lung resection for lung cancer to guide patient education and management, and to better understand the postoperative patient experience. METHODS: Procedures were identified by current procedural terminology and international classification of disease codes using the 2012-17 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset. Propensity score analysis was used to assess the relationship between surgical approach and nonhome discharge destination (primary outcome), and postoperative complications, related unplanned readmission, and mortality (secondary outcomes). RESULTS: A total of 17,303 patients underwent anatomic lung resection for lung cancer including 10,121 (58.5%) minimally invasive and 7,182 (41.5%) open resections. Open resection patients had 60% greater odds of nonhome discharge (p
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research

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CONCLUSIONS: The 4-year cost of surgical resection for NSCLC was substantial and increased with pathologic stage. Among Stage I lobectomy patients, those selected for minimally invasive surgery had lower costs, particularly through 90 days. Potential avenues for improving the value of surgical resection include judicious use of post-operative intensive care and earlier detection and treatment of disease. PMID: 33031776 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Thorac Surg Source Type: research
We examined time trends in surgical approach and outcomes among patients undergoing minimally invasive (MIS, robotic and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery[VATS]) versus open lobectomy in this patient population. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients from the National Cancer Database diagnosed with clinical Stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC from 2010-2016. We examined the yearly proportion of MIS versus open resections.
Source: Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: THORACIC – Original Submission Source Type: research
This article summarizes the current application of ERAS in the field of thoracic surgery and the development prospects of day surgery models in China. DOI: 10.3779/j.issn.1009-3419.2020.102.08
Source: Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Minimally invasive surgery for thoracic procedures has increased steadily over the last decade, with video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) accounting for over 60% of lobectomies in 2015.1 While the use of VATS for lobectomy in lung cancer patients has increased, there has also been a concurrent increase in the use of robotic assisted thoracoscopic surgery (RATS).2 Both approaches have been associated with improved postoperative complications and pain compared to open lobectomy,3,4 with no detrimental effect on oncologic resection or overall survival.
Source: Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: THORACIC – Commentary Source Type: research
Publication date: February 2020Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Volume 109, Issue 2Author(s): Rohun Bhagat, Michael R. Bronsert, William G. Henderson, Christopher D. Scott, Michael J. Weyant, John D. Mitchell, David A. Fullerton, Robert A. MeguidBackgroundPatients express strong opinion regarding discharge destination, preferring discharge home vs elsewhere. As focus on patient satisfaction increases, we sought to understand differences in postoperative discharge destination after minimally invasive vs open anatomic lung resection for lung cancer to guide patient education and management and better understand the po...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Reduced use of epidural analgesia has had no negative short-term effect on patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) lobectomy, researchers have found.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news
The foundation of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is closely related to the minimally invasive surgery progress. In the development of ERAS, technology is utilized and humanistic factors are integrated to make it higher than technology, thus enriching the connotation and extension of ERAS. Based on the progress of ERAS in various fields of surgery in recent years, the current situation and strategies of clinical application of ERAS are summarized. First, the clinical practice of ERAS is inevitable for minimally invasive surgery progress. Second, the development of surgery theory and technology has deepened and expan...
Source: Chinese Journal of Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Objective: Investigate the effect of smoking cessation timing on the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery program in terms of postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC) rate and hospital length of stay (LOS) after videothoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy for lung cancer patients.Methods: Patients with early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma who underwent VATS lobectomy between January 2017 and 2019 were enrolled, prospectively. Relationship between timing of smoke cessation in ERAS program and PPC incidence was studied by 2 cohorts: Group 1 consisted of non-smokers or patients who quitted ≥4 weeks before operation. Group 2 cons...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Thoracic surgery Source Type: research
Objective: To investigate cancer- and noncancer-specific mortality following lobectomy by minimally invasive surgery (MIS) versus open thoracotomy in elderly patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Background: Two-thirds of patients with NSCLC are ≥65 years of age. As age increases, the risk of competing events, such as noncancer death, also increases. Methods: Elderly patients (≥65 yrs of age) who have undergone curative-intent lobectomy for stage I-III NSCLC without induction therapy (2002–2013) were included (n=1,303). Of those, 607 patients had undergone MIS and 696 had undergone thoracotom...
Source: Annals of Surgery - Category: Surgery Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLES Source Type: research
The last decade has seen a transition in the surgical approach to lobectomy, from thoracotomy to minimally invasive surgery (MIS), for treating patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) [1]. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MIS lobectomy, including video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS), is associated with fewer postoperative complications such as arrhythmias and pneumonia and shorter chest tube duration and length of hospital stay [2 –8].
Source: Lung Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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