Intracranial cns infections: a literature review and radiology case studies

This article will provide a thorough review of radiologic findings in common infections of the brain, from primarily compartmentalized infections of multi-microbial etiologies, to CNS manifestations of specific immunocompromised-selective pathogens, of herpes simplex virus (HSV), and of tuberculosis. We also briefly discuss the epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, treatment guidelines, complications, and long-term sequelae of these infections.
Source: Seminars in Ultrasound, CT and MRI - Category: Radiology Source Type: research

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Opportunistic infections are those that are either more frequent or more severe as a result of the patient’s immunosuppressed condition. Opportunistic infections are, of course, the distinguishing feature of HIV infection, and they can be the cause of serious morbidity and even mortality. Some opportunistic infections can be prevented by vaccination, for example, pneumococcal infection, meningococcal infection, influenza, hepatitis A and B, and varicella. Other major opportunistic infections require prophylactic antibiotics or antiviral medications. In obstetric patients, pneumocystis infections and toxoplasmosis are...
Source: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: New Antibiotics and Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Obstetrics Source Type: research
Discussion Transplantation is not a common problem for primary care physicians but when a child’s disease has progressed to end-stage organ failure, transplantation can be the only treatment available. While the primary care provider usually is not involved in the daily management of patients before, during and after transplantation, they can be involved in many areas. These can include providing appropriate primary and acute care, ordering and obtaining necessary medical tests, medications and equipment, assisting with medical insurance, providing medical history and records to consultants, translating medical infor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Discussion Facial nerve palsy has been known for centuries, but in 1821 unilateral facial nerve paralysis was described by Sir Charles Bell. Bell’s palsy (BP) is a unilateral, acute facial paralysis that is clinically diagnosed after other etiologies have been excluded by appropriate history, physical examination and/or laboratory testing or imaging. Symptoms include abnormal movement of facial nerve. It can be associated with changes in facial sensation, hearing, taste or excessive tearing. The right and left sides are equally affected but bilateral BP is rare (0.3%). Paralysis can be complete or incomplete at prese...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Gulcin Tezcan1, Ekaterina V. Martynova1, Zarema E. Gilazieva1, Alan McIntyre2, Albert A. Rizvanov1 and Svetlana F. Khaiboullina1,3* 1Institute of Fundamental Medicine and Biology, Kazan Federal University, Kazan, Russia 2Centre for Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, NV, United States Inflammation has a crucial role in protection against various pathogens. The inflammasome is an intracellular multiprotein signaling complex that is linked to pathogen sensing and...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
In this study, herpes virus serological status and T cell, B cell, NK cell and monocyte populations were investigated in 251 ME/CFS patients, including 54 who were severely affected, and compared with those from 107 healthy participants and with 46 patients with Multiple Sclerosis. There were no differences in seroprevalence for six human herpes viruses between ME/CFS and healthy controls, although seroprevalence for the Epstein-Barr virus was higher in multiple sclerosis patients. Contrary to previous reports, no significant differences were observed in NK cell numbers, subtype proportions or in vitro responsiveness betwe...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Pedro Curto1,2,3,4, Sean P. Riley4, Isaura Simões3,4*† and Juan J. Martinez4*† 1Ph.D. Programme in Experimental Biology and Biomedicine, Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal2Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal3CNC-Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Coimbra, Portugal4Vector Borne Disease Laboratories, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA, United States Despite their high degree of genomic similarity, different spotted fever group (SFG) Ricketts...
Source: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
This study was provided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Manitoba Health Research Council. Conflict of Interest Statement The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest. References 1. Sprent J, Kishimoto H. The thymus and central tolerance. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. (2001) 356:609–16. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2001.0846 PubMed Abstract | CrossRef Full Text | Google Scholar 2. Sakaguchi S, Wing K, Miyara M. Regulatory T cells - a brief history and perspective. ...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
​Conjunctivitis is a common condition and easy enough to treat, but several uncommon conjunctivitis syndromes require more care and should not be missed.Conjunctivitis is either infectious (viral or bacterial) or noninfectious (allergic or nonallergic). Viral infections are more common in adults, bacterial ones in children, usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Adults tend to have more S. aureus infections, while the other pathogens are more common in children. An adenovirus is typically responsible for viral-associated infections in conjunct...
Source: M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
Abstract: Cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, comprising 1-2% of cases. Caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or related strains, it presents a wide range of clinical manifestations, mimicking other chronic dermatoses and leading to delayed diagnosis. A case of scrofuloderma is reported, whose diagnosis and treatment were only made six years after onset of the disease.
Source: Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
ConclusionOur study shows a wide diversity of etiologies of LE in Morocco with essentially an acute mode of onset of symptoms.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
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