Proposal for a definition for response to treatment, inactive disease and damage for JIA associated uveitis based on the validation of a uveitis related JIA outcome measures from the Multinational Interdisciplinary Working Group for Uveitis in Childhood (MIWGUC)

JIA-associated uveitis (JIAU) is a serious, sight-threatening disease with significant long-term complications and risk of blindness, even with improved contemporary treatments. The MIWGUC was set up in order ...
Source: Pediatric Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research

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It’s only been seven years since scientists first learned how to precisely and reliably splice the human genome using a tool called CRISPR, making it possible to think about snipping out disease-causing mutations and actually cure, once and for all, genetic diseases ranging from sickle cell anemia to certain types of cancer and even blindness. Doctors are plunging ahead in search of ways to use the relatively new technology to start treating patients. In China last November, scientist Jiankui He stunned—and dismayed—the genetic community when he announced he had already used CRISPR, which many believe sti...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Blind children learn to recognize SSD-delivered letters better than seeing controls and had greater N400 amplitude in the occipital region. To the best of our knowledge, our results provide the first published example of standard letter recognition (not Braille) by children with blindness using a tactile delivery system. PMID: 31227674 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience - Category: Neurology Tags: Restor Neurol Neurosci Source Type: research
By LYNLY JEANLOUIS Health insurance companies are standing in the way of many patients receiving affordable, quality healthcare. Insurance companies have been denying patient claims for medical care, all while increasing monthly premiums for most Americans. Many of the nation’s largest healthcare payers are private “for-profit” companies that are focused on generating profits through the healthcare system. Through a rigorous approval/denial system, health insurance companies can dictate the type care patients receive. In some cases, this has resulted in patients foregoing life-saving treatments or proc...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Health insurance Lynly Jeanlouis private health insurance Quality improvement Quality of care Source Type: blogs
Sarah K. Azzam1, Wael M. Osman2, Sungmun Lee1, Kinda Khalaf1, Ahsan H. Khandoker1, Wael Almahmeed3,4, Herbert F. Jelinek5 and Habiba S. Al Safar1,2* 1Biomedical Engineering Department, Khalifa University of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 2Khalifa University Center of Biotechnology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 3Institute of Cardiac Science, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 4Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates 5Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Sydney and School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, Ma...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) today announced preliminary results from a small feasibility study of its Orion cortical implant, which is designed to give eyesight to the blind. Sylmar, Calif.-based Second Sight’s Orion is designed to connect the camera in a pair of eyeglasses with an implant that receives the camera signal and translates it to the visual cortex in the brain, bypassing the eye and the optic nerve entirely. The company’s Argus II device, which uses a retinal implant to receive the camera’s signal, is already on the U.S. market. Interim data from a five-year early feasibility study, prese...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Clinical Trials Featured Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news
Christine I. Alston1,2 and Richard D. Dix1,2* 1Department of Biology, Viral Immunology Center, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, United States 2Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins provide selective negative feedback to prevent pathogeneses caused by overstimulation of the immune system. Of the eight known SOCS proteins, SOCS1 and SOCS3 are the best studied, and systemic deletion of either gene causes early lethality in mice. Many viruses, including herpesviruses such as herpes simplex virus and cytomega...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 7 March 2019Source: NeuroImageAuthor(s): Johanna M. Rimmele, Helene Gudi-Mindermann, Guido Nolte, Brigitte Röder, Andreas K. EngelAbstractCongenitally blind individuals have been shown to activate the visual cortex during non-visual tasks. The neuronal mechanisms of such cross-modal activation are not fully understood. Here, we used an auditory working memory training paradigm in congenitally blind and in sighted adults. We hypothesized that the visual cortex gets integrated into auditory working memory networks, after these networks have been challenged by training. The spectral pro...
Source: NeuroImage - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
First, a sort of meta-comment in the form of a shout-out to HCRenewal's intrepid editor, Dr. Roy Poses, for his just-published analysis of what we might call " blogging: rise and fall. " He sees decline reflected in publications long  devoted to health and health policy, yet now flaking off.Methinks, however, despite the usefulness of his overview of recent decades, Dr. P need not fret excessively. Water spilling out of the barrel's lip will slow down once folks come along and punch a whole bunch of little mid-section tweet-holes in it. Information still flows. (Sort of.)  In any case, surely there's ov...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Source Type: blogs
Easy-to-use, accessible and relatively low-cost solution for a widely experienced problem: these are my favorite digital health innovations. EyeQue Insight lets anyone test their vision at home so people living in rural areas, with special needs or no access to transportation could still make sure they have the necessary sight test from time to time. Here’s our EyeQue Insight review. Have you seen the numbers? What about the letters? Eye problems are global phenomena: the World Health Organisation estimates that approximately 1.3 billion people live with some form of vision impairment. That means on average at least ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients eye eye test future home Innovation ophthalmology review technology testing vision Source Type: blogs
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