Inventing a herbal tradition: The complex roots of the current popularity of Epilobium angustifolium in Eastern Europe

ConclusionsHistorical ethnobotanical investigations could help to avoid creating repeating waves of popularity of plants that have already been tried for certain diseases and later abandoned as not fully effective. There is, of course, a chance that E. angustifolium could also finally be proven to be clinically safe and cost-effective for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia, but this has not yet happened despite recent intensive research. Documented traditional use would suggest investigating the dermatological, intestinal anti-hemorrhagic and pain inhibiting properties of this plant, if any.Graphical abstract
Source: Journal of Ethnopharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research

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Authors: Chu Y, Ge W, Wang X Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. The present study investigated the effects of miR-448 on the progression of neuropathic pain in a rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was conducted to detect the gene expression. The paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) were used to assess the pain threshold. The protein expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were detecte...
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Publication date: 1 January 2020Source: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, Volume 185Author(s): Furqan A. Maulvi, Lakshmi V. Pillai, Kajal P. Patel, Ankita R. Desai, Manish R. Shukla, Ditixa T. Desai, Hetal P. Patel, Ketan M. Ranch, Shailesh A. Shah, Dinesh O. ShahAbstractLidocaine is widely used as a local anaesthetic in the clinical practice to manage pre- and post-operative pain, skin burns, etc. However, the short duration of action (
Source: Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces - Category: Biochemistry Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 December 2019Source: Regional Science and Urban EconomicsAuthor(s): Stefanie Gaebler, Niklas Potrafke, Felix RoeselAbstractWe examine whether compulsory voting influences political participation as measured by voter turnout, invalid voting, political interest, confidence in parliament, and party membership. In Austria, some states temporarily introduced compulsory voting in national elections. We investigate border municipalities across two states which differ in compulsory voting legislation using a difference-in-differences approach. The results show that compulsory voting increased v...
Source: Regional Science and Urban Economics - Category: Science Source Type: research
All people are the same; only their habits differ. ~ Confucius This is a post about what keeps us stuck and sets us free, about the good news behind bad luck, and the wrong way to want the right thing: It’s about our habits. Human beings are creatures of habit — even emotionally. But why is this? Why do we fall into routines? And why is it so hard to break a habit? The short answer is something called set point. You’re probably familiar with this idea if you have ever been on a diet or had a new year’s resolution. They both start well. You are going to make a change in your life and you are ready fo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Habits Happiness Proof Positive Self-Help Appreciation Gratitude habituation Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis found cardiovascular factors to be the main causes for both 30-day and 1‑year rehospitalization. Heart failure represented the most common cardiovascular event at both short-term and mid-term follow-up. Several baseline characteristics and procedure-related factors were deemed unfavorable predictors of readmission. Importantly, transfemoral access and female gender were associated with a lower risk of readmission. PMID: 31807789 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Herz - Category: Cardiology Tags: Herz Source Type: research
Authors: Guan Z, Song Y, Ma J, Li F, Zhao X, Liang G, An H, Pu J Abstract Long non-coding (lnc)RNA NCK1 antisense RNA 1 (NCK1-AS1) has been characterized as an oncogene in cervical cancer, while its role in prostate cancer (PC) remains unknown. It was revealed in the present study that plasma NCK1-AS1 was upregulated in patients with PC when compared with patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and healthy controls. Upregulation of NCK1-AS1 distinguished patients with PC from patients with BPH and healthy controls. Overexpression of NCK1-AS1 led to significantly upregulated transforming growth factor (TGF)...
Source: Oncology Letters - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncol Lett Source Type: research
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Publication date: 7 December 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 244, Issue 3259Author(s): Chris Stokel-Walker
Source: New Scientist - Category: Science Source Type: research
Authors: Broadhead DY, Douglas HE, Bezjian Wallace LM, Wallace PJ, Tamura S, Morgan KC, Hemler DE Abstract Back pain and its associated complications are of increasing importance among military members. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a common source of chronic low back pain (LBP) and functional disability. Many patients suffering from chronic LBP utilize opioids to help control their symptoms. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used extensively to treat pain emanating from many different musculoskeletal origins; however, its use in the SIJ has been studied only on a limited basis. The patient in this case report pr...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
I am thinking about possibly doing a Psychiatry fellowship in the future and I heard some guy on Reddit mentioning "Interventional Pain Psychiatry", but I haven't been able to find any information about this fellowship online. All I found was something called "Interventional Psychiatry" where they do ECT and Ketamine infusions. What's the difference and how can I find out more information about these two? Does anyone know about these subspecialties?
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Psychiatry Source Type: forums
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