Underlying nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a significant factor for breast cancer recurrence after curative surgery

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and it is a main cause of death in women. As with breast cancer, metabolic components are important risk factors for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of NAFLD in patients with breast cancer and the impact of NAFLD on the prognosis of breast cancer. Patients with breast cancer were enrolled in the study from January 2007 to June 2017. Hepatic steatosis was evaluated through non-enhanced computed tomography scan by measuring Hounsfield Units in the liver and spleen, respectively; 123 healthy controls who underwent non-enhanced computed tomography scan were also analyzed. The prevalence of NAFLD in patients with breast cancer was 15.8% (251/1587), which was significantly higher than in healthy controls (8.9%, 11/123) (P = .036). Overall survival did not significantly differ between the groups with and without NAFLD (P = .304). However, recurrence-free survival was significantly higher in patients without NAFLD than in those with NAFLD (P = .009). Among breast cancer patients receiving endocrine treatment, the NAFLD group showed a higher cumulative incidence of significant liver injury than the group without NAFLD (P 
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Observational Study Source Type: research

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Conclusion.Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer.Implications for Practice.Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity‐matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compar...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 April 2019Source: Journal of Sport and Health ScienceAuthor(s): Xin Luan, Xiangyang Tian, Haixin Zhang, Rui Huang, Na Li, Peijie Chen, Ru WangAbstractA growing understanding of the benefits of exercise over the past few decades has prompted researchers to take an interest in the possibilities of exercise therapy. Because each sport has its own set of characteristics and physiological complications that tend to appear during exercise training, the effects and underlying mechanisms of exercise remain unclear. Thus, the first step in probing exercise effects on different diseases is the s...
Source: Journal of Sport and Health Science - Category: Sports Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Results of this study suggest that inhibition of estrogen synthesis in postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with aromatase inhibitors could increase the risk of NAFLD, which might have some influence on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Unlike tamoxifen, the role of aromatase inhibitor treatment use in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in development of fatty liver is not well known. In this propensity-matched cohort study, postmenopausal patients with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors had increased risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease ...
Source: The Oncologist - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Oncologist Source Type: research
Growing evidence supports that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with extrahepatic cancers. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and breast cancer share similar risk factors, including obesity.
Source: Digestive and Liver Disease - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Liver, Pancreas and Biliary Tract Source Type: research
We appreciate Bo Zheng et al. for their interest in our study and for providing a valuable comment. Our study investigated the little understood relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and extrahepatic cancers [1], and found that NAFLD was highly associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer in males, and breast cancer in females. This association suggests that NAFLD can serve as a risk factor of extrahepatic malignancies.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We read with great interests the article by Gi-Ae et al[1]. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease(NAFLD) is strongly associated with metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases which implies that NAFLD might have an important part in extrahepatic complications. Gi-Ae et al not only confirmed that NAFLD is closely related to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma but also demonstrated that NAFLD is a risk factor for extrahepatic malignancies such as male colorectal carcinoma and female breast cancer.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
We thank Bo Zheng et al. for their interest in our study and for providing a valuable comment.1 Our study investigated the little understood relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and extrahepatic cancers,2 and found that NAFLD was highly associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer in males, and breast cancer in females. This association suggests that NAFLD can serve as a risk factor of extrahepatic malignancies.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We read with great interest the article by Kim et al.1 Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, suggesting that NAFLD is an important factor in extrahepatic complications. Kim et al. not only confirmed that NAFLD is closely related to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, but also demonstrated that NAFLD is a risk factor for extrahepatic malignancies such as male colorectal carcinoma and female breast cancer.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We thank Bo Zheng et al. for their interest in our study and for providing a valuable comment.1 Our study investigated the little understood relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and extrahepatic cancers,2 and found that NAFLD was highly associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer in males, and breast cancer in females. This association suggests that NAFLD can serve as a risk factor of extrahepatic malignancies.
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
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