Is there a test for Alzheimer ’s disease?

After spending 30 minutes hunting for your car in a parking lot, or getting lost on a familiar route, have you ever considered asking your doctor for a blood test or brain scan to find out if you have Alzheimer’s disease? A number of factors contribute to Alzheimer’s disease. By definition, this form of dementia involves the buildup of a protein in brain called beta-amyloid. Beta-amyloid forms plaques that disrupt communication between brain cells, and ultimately destroys them. For this reason, tests for Alzheimer’s disease focus on beta-amyloid. Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease are being developed Recently, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis measured the levels of beta-amyloid in the blood of 158 mostly normal people (10 had cognitive impairment). When they compared their findings with those of amyloid brain PET (positron emission tomography) scans performed within 18 months of the blood draw, they found very similar results. Moreover, the few people in their study who had a positive blood test and negative brain scan were actually 21 times more likely to have a positive brain scan in the future. This means that the new blood test may be extremely sensitive at detecting Alzheimer’s disease — that is, it results in few false negatives. If you’re worried about your memory, should you ask your doctor for this test? Not yet — the blood test is still being evaluated and is not currently available for clinical use. ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Healthy Aging Memory Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Psychology Around the Net alzheimer's Body Dysmorphic Disorder Boundaries Codependency Eating Disorders Oxytocin Postpartum revenge bedtime procrastination Sleep Source Type: blogs
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Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Neurobiology of Aging - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Neurobiol Aging Source Type: research
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Source: Current Nutrition and Food Science - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
DEMENTIA symptoms include memory loss, difficulty concentrating, and having slower thoughts. But, you could lower your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease signs with this simple breakfast swap. Should you change the foods you eat to protect against dementia?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
DEMENTIA symptoms include memory loss, difficulty concentrating, and having slower thoughts. But, you could lower your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease with this "single most important" diet swap. Should you change the foods you eat to protect against dementia?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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